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Population-Attributable Risk of Risk Factors for Recurrent Wheezing in Moderate Preterm Infants During the First Year of Life

Overview of attention for article published in Paediatric & Perinatal Epidemiology, May 2016
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Title
Population-Attributable Risk of Risk Factors for Recurrent Wheezing in Moderate Preterm Infants During the First Year of Life
Published in
Paediatric & Perinatal Epidemiology, May 2016
DOI 10.1111/ppe.12295
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maarten O. Blanken, Koos Korsten, Niek B. Achten, Saskia Tamminga, Elisabeth E. Nibbelke, Elisabeth A.M. Sanders, Henriette A. Smit, Rolf H.H. Groenwold, Louis Bont

Abstract

Recurrent wheezing in young infants has a high prevalence, influences quality of life, and generates substantial health care costs. We previously showed that respiratory syncytial virus infection is an important mechanism of recurrent wheezing in moderate preterm infants. We aimed to provide population-attributable risks (PAR) of risk factors for recurrent wheezing during the first year of life in otherwise healthy moderate preterm infants. RISK is a multicentre prospective birth cohort study of 4424 moderate preterm infants born at 32-35 weeks gestation. We estimated PAR of risk factors for recurrent wheezing, which was defined as three or more parent-reported wheezing episodes during the first year of life. We evaluated 3952 (89%) children at 1 year of age, of whom 705 infants (18%) developed recurrent wheezing. Fourteen variables were independently associated with recurrent wheezing. Hospitalisation for respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis had a strong relationship with recurrent wheezing (RR 2.6; 95% confidence interval, CI, 2.2, 3.1), but a relative modest PAR (8%; 95% CI 6, 11%) which can be explained by a low prevalence (13%). Day-care attendance showed a strong relationship with recurrent wheezing (RR 1.9; 95% CI 1.7, 2.2) and the highest PAR (32%; 95% CI 23, 37%) due to a high prevalence (67%). The combined adjusted PAR for the 14 risk factors associated with recurrent wheezing was 49% (95% CI 46, 52%). In moderate preterm infants, day-care attendance has the largest PAR for recurrent wheezing. Trial evidence is needed to determine the potential benefit of delayed day-care attendance in this population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 23%
Researcher 11 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 8%
Psychology 3 6%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 9 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2016.
All research outputs
#9,544,613
of 12,422,086 outputs
Outputs from Paediatric & Perinatal Epidemiology
#548
of 692 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,053
of 268,990 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Paediatric & Perinatal Epidemiology
#17
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,422,086 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 692 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,990 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.