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Predictors of time to claim closure following a non-catastrophic injury sustained in a motor vehicle crash: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Predictors of time to claim closure following a non-catastrophic injury sustained in a motor vehicle crash: a prospective cohort study
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3093-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bamini Gopinath, Nieke A. Elbers, Jagnoor, Ian A. Harris, Michael Nicholas, Petrina Casey, Fiona Blyth, Christopher G. Maher, Ian D. Cameron

Abstract

Research suggests that exposure to the compensation system (including time to case closure) could adversely influence a persons' recovery following injury. However, the long-term predictors of time to claim closure following minor road traffic injuries remain unclear. We aimed to assess a wide spectrum of factors that could influence time to claim closure (socio-demographic, compensation-related, health, psychosocial and pre-injury factors) over 24 months following a non-catastrophic injury. Prospective cohort study of 364 participants involved in a compensation scheme following a motor vehicle crash. We used a telephone-administered questionnaire to obtain information on potential explanatory variables. Information on time to claim closure was obtained from an insurance regulatory authority maintained database, and was classified as the duration between the crash date and claim settlement date, and categorized into < 12 (early), > 12-24 (medium) and > 24 months (late). Just over half of claimants (54 %) had settled their claim by 12 months, while 17 % and 30 % took > 12-24 months and > 24 months for claim closure, respectively. Whiplash at baseline was associated with claim closure time of > 12-24 months versus < 12 months: multivariable-adjusted OR 2.38 (95 % CI 1.06-5.39). Claimants who were overweight/obese versus normal/underweight at the time of injury were ~3.0-fold more likely to settle their claim at > 12-24 months than < 12 months. Consulting a lawyer was associated with a 10.4- and 21.0-fold increased likelihood of settling a claim at > 12-24 months and > 24 months, respectively. Each 1-unit increase in Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire scores at baseline was associated with greater odds of both medium (> 12-24 months) and delayed claim settlement date (> 24 months): multivariable-adjusted OR 1.04 (95 % CU 1.01-1.07) and 1.02 (95 % CI 1.00-1.05), respectively. Around a third of claimants with a minor injury had not settled by 24 months. Health-related factors and lawyer involvement independently influenced time to claim closure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Researcher 4 13%
Professor 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 10 31%
Unknown 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 44%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 16%
Psychology 2 6%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 7 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,783,331
of 7,729,992 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,636
of 6,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,672
of 268,456 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#131
of 174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,729,992 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,690 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,456 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.