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Allometric Scaling of Patrolling Rate and Nest Volume in Constrictotermes cyphergaster Termites: Hints on the Settlement of Inquilines

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, January 2016
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Title
Allometric Scaling of Patrolling Rate and Nest Volume in Constrictotermes cyphergaster Termites: Hints on the Settlement of Inquilines
Published in
PLOS ONE, January 2016
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0147594
Pubmed ID
Authors

Og DeSouza, Ana Paula Albano Araújo, Daniela Faria Florencio, Cassiano Sousa Rosa, Alessandra Marins, Diogo Andrade Costa, Vinicius Barros Rodrigues, Paulo Fellipe Cristaldo

Abstract

Structural and functional traits of organisms are known to be related to the size of individuals and to the size of their colonies when they belong to one. Among such traits, propensity to inquilinism in termites is known to relate positively to colony size. Larger termitaria hold larger diversity of facultative inquilines than smaller nests, whereas obligate inquilines seem unable to settle in nests smaller than a threshold volume. Respective underlying mechanisms, however, remain hypothetical. Here we test one of such hypotheses, namely, that nest defence correlates negatively to nest volume in Constrictotermes cyphergaster termites (Termitidae: Nasutitermitinae). As a surrogate to defence, we used 'patrolling rate', i.e., the number of termite individuals attending per unit time an experimentally damaged spot on the outer wall of their termitaria. We found that patrolling rate decayed allometrically with increasing nest size. Conspicuously higher patrolling rates occurred in smaller nests, while conspicuously lower rates occurred in larger nests presenting volumes in the vicinity of the threshold value for the establishment of inquilinism. This could be proven adaptive for the host and guest. At younger nest age, host colonies are smaller and presumably more vulnerable and unstable. Enhanced defence rates may, hence, prevent eventual risks to hosts from inquilinism at the same time that it prevents inquilines to settle in a still unstable nest. Conversely, when colonies grow and maturate enough to stand threats, they would invest in priorities other than active defence, opening an opportunity for inquilines to settle in nests which are more suitable or less risky. Under this two-fold process, cohabitation between host and inquiline could readily stabilize.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 9%
Unknown 31 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 35%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Professor 6 18%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 71%
Environmental Science 3 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Materials Science 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 May 2016.
All research outputs
#4,013,227
of 7,737,442 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#63,226
of 109,875 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,582
of 268,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#2,927
of 4,628 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,737,442 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 109,875 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,515 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,628 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.