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Quantitative evidence for the effects of multiple drivers on continental-scale amphibian declines

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
18 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
18 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
136 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
233 Mendeley
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Title
Quantitative evidence for the effects of multiple drivers on continental-scale amphibian declines
Published in
Scientific Reports, May 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep25625
Pubmed ID
Authors

Evan H. Campbell Grant, David A. W. Miller, Benedikt R. Schmidt, Michael J. Adams, Staci M. Amburgey, Thierry Chambert, Sam S. Cruickshank, Robert N. Fisher, David M. Green, Blake R. Hossack, Pieter T. J. Johnson, Maxwell B. Joseph, Tracy A. G. Rittenhouse, Maureen E. Ryan, J. Hardin Waddle, Susan C. Walls, Larissa L. Bailey, Gary M. Fellers, Thomas A. Gorman, Andrew M. Ray, David S. Pilliod, Steven J. Price, Daniel Saenz, Walt Sadinski, Erin Muths

Abstract

Since amphibian declines were first proposed as a global phenomenon over a quarter century ago, the conservation community has made little progress in halting or reversing these trends. The early search for a "smoking gun" was replaced with the expectation that declines are caused by multiple drivers. While field observations and experiments have identified factors leading to increased local extinction risk, evidence for effects of these drivers is lacking at large spatial scales. Here, we use observations of 389 time-series of 83 species and complexes from 61 study areas across North America to test the effects of 4 of the major hypothesized drivers of declines. While we find that local amphibian populations are being lost from metapopulations at an average rate of 3.79% per year, these declines are not related to any particular threat at the continental scale; likewise the effect of each stressor is variable at regional scales. This result - that exposure to threats varies spatially, and populations vary in their response - provides little generality in the development of conservation strategies. Greater emphasis on local solutions to this globally shared phenomenon is needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 233 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Mexico 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Puerto Rico 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 223 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 49 21%
Researcher 45 19%
Student > Bachelor 38 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 15%
Other 13 6%
Other 34 15%
Unknown 18 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 129 55%
Environmental Science 53 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 1%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 <1%
Other 7 3%
Unknown 28 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 167. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2020.
All research outputs
#145,999
of 18,687,462 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#1,781
of 100,188 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,813
of 274,884 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#70
of 3,285 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,687,462 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 100,188 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,884 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,285 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.