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Common and distinct patterns of grey-matter volume alteration in major depression and bipolar disorder: evidence from voxel-based meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Psychiatry, May 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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12 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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116 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
195 Mendeley
Title
Common and distinct patterns of grey-matter volume alteration in major depression and bipolar disorder: evidence from voxel-based meta-analysis
Published in
Molecular Psychiatry, May 2016
DOI 10.1038/mp.2016.72
Pubmed ID
Authors

T Wise, J Radua, E Via, N Cardoner, O Abe, T M Adams, F Amico, Y Cheng, J H Cole, C de Azevedo Marques Périco, D P Dickstein, T F D Farrow, T Frodl, G Wagner, I H Gotlib, O Gruber, B J Ham, D E Job, M J Kempton, M J Kim, P C M P Koolschijn, G S Malhi, D Mataix-Cols, A M McIntosh, A C Nugent, J T O'Brien, S Pezzoli, M L Phillips, P S Sachdev, G Salvadore, S Selvaraj, A C Stanfield, A J Thomas, M J van Tol, N J A van der Wee, D J Veltman, A H Young, C H Fu, A J Cleare, D Arnone

Abstract

Finding robust brain substrates of mood disorders is an important target for research. The degree to which major depression (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) are associated with common and/or distinct patterns of volumetric changes is nevertheless unclear. Furthermore, the extant literature is heterogeneous with respect to the nature of these changes. We report a meta-analysis of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies in MDD and BD. We identified studies published up to January 2015 that compared grey matter in MDD (50 data sets including 4101 individuals) and BD (36 data sets including 2407 individuals) using whole-brain VBM. We used statistical maps from the studies included where available and reported peak coordinates otherwise. Group comparisons and conjunction analyses identified regions in which the disorders showed common and distinct patterns of volumetric alteration. Both disorders were associated with lower grey-matter volume relative to healthy individuals in a number of areas. Conjunction analysis showed smaller volumes in both disorders in clusters in the dorsomedial and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, including the anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral insula. Group comparisons indicated that findings of smaller grey-matter volumes relative to controls in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left hippocampus, along with cerebellar, temporal and parietal regions were more substantial in major depression. These results suggest that MDD and BD are characterised by both common and distinct patterns of grey-matter volume changes. This combination of differences and similarities has the potential to inform the development of diagnostic biomarkers for these conditions.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 24 May 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.72.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 195 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 192 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 22%
Unspecified 32 16%
Researcher 29 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 10%
Student > Bachelor 15 8%
Other 57 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 48 25%
Psychology 42 22%
Neuroscience 41 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 38 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 4%
Other 18 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2018.
All research outputs
#1,522,611
of 13,757,473 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Psychiatry
#1,063
of 2,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,663
of 264,887 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Psychiatry
#33
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,757,473 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,745 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,887 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.