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1,500 year quantitative reconstruction of winter precipitation in the Pacific Northwest

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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74 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
118 Mendeley
Title
1,500 year quantitative reconstruction of winter precipitation in the Pacific Northwest
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2012
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1201083109
Pubmed ID
Authors

Byron A. Steinman, Mark B. Abbott, Michael E. Mann, Nathan D. Stansell, Bruce P. Finney

Abstract

Multiple paleoclimate proxies are required for robust assessment of past hydroclimatic conditions. Currently, estimates of drought variability over the past several thousand years are based largely on tree-ring records. We produced a 1,500-y record of winter precipitation in the Pacific Northwest using a physical model-based analysis of lake sediment oxygen isotope data. Our results indicate that during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) (900-1300 AD) the Pacific Northwest experienced exceptional wetness in winter and that during the Little Ice Age (LIA) (1450-1850 AD) conditions were drier, contrasting with hydroclimatic anomalies in the desert Southwest and consistent with climate dynamics related to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). These findings are somewhat discordant with drought records from tree rings, suggesting that differences in seasonal sensitivity between the two proxies allow a more compete understanding of the climate system and likely explain disparities in inferred climate trends over centennial timescales.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 113 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 24%
Researcher 28 24%
Student > Master 14 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 7%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Other 18 15%
Unknown 15 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 43 36%
Environmental Science 30 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 8%
Engineering 4 3%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Other 7 6%
Unknown 21 18%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2013.
All research outputs
#1,698,704
of 25,587,485 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#22,079
of 103,382 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,690
of 177,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#193
of 957 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,587,485 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 103,382 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 177,945 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 957 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.