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Pain after earthquake

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Pain after earthquake
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1757-7241-20-43
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chiara Angeletti, Cristiana Guetti, Roberta Papola, Emiliano Petrucci, Maria Ursini, Alessandra Ciccozzi, Francesca Masi, Maria Russo, Salvatore Squarcione, Antonella Paladini, Joseph Pergolizzi, Robert Taylor, Giustino Varrassi, Franco Marinangeli

Abstract

On 6 April 2009, at 03:32 local time, an Mw 6.3 earthquake hit the Abruzzi region of central Italy causing widespread damage in the City of L Aquila and its nearby villages. The earthquake caused 308 casualties and over 1,500 injuries, displaced more than 25,000 people and induced significant damage to more than 10,000 buildings in the L'Aquila region. This observational retrospective study evaluated the prevalence and drug treatment of pain in the five weeks following the L'Aquila earthquake (April 6, 2009). 958 triage documents were analysed for patients pain severity, pain type, and treatment efficacy. A third of pain patients reported pain with a prevalence of 34.6%. More than half of pain patients reported severe pain (58.8%). Analgesic agents were limited to available drugs: anti-inflammatory agents, paracetamol, and weak opioids. Reduction in verbal numerical pain scores within the first 24 hours after treatment was achieved with the medications at hand. Pain prevalence and characterization exhibited a biphasic pattern with acute pain syndromes owing to trauma occurring in the first 15 days after the earthquake; traumatic pain then decreased and re-surged at around week five, owing to rebuilding efforts. In the second through fourth week, reports of pain occurred mainly owing to relapses of chronic conditions. This study indicates that pain is prevalent during natural disasters, may exhibit a discernible pattern over the weeks following the event, and current drug treatments in this region may be adequate for emergency situations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 6%
Italy 1 3%
Unknown 30 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 24%
Other 5 15%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 61%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2012.
All research outputs
#5,986,657
of 11,351,626 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#363
of 705 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,229
of 107,755 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#6
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,351,626 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 705 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 107,755 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.