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Doll Play Narratives About Starting School in Children of Socially Anxious Mothers, and Their Relation to Subsequent Child School-Based Anxiety

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, May 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
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Title
Doll Play Narratives About Starting School in Children of Socially Anxious Mothers, and Their Relation to Subsequent Child School-Based Anxiety
Published in
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, May 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10802-012-9645-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Pass, Adriane Arteche, Peter Cooper, Cathy Creswell, Lynne Murray

Abstract

Child social anxiety is common, and predicts later emotional and academic impairment. Offspring of socially anxious mothers are at increased risk. It is important to establish whether individual vulnerability to disorder can be identified in young children. The responses of 4.5 year-old children of mothers with social phobia (N = 62) and non-anxious mothers (N = 60) were compared, two months before school entry, using a Doll Play (DP) procedure focused on the social challenge of starting school. DP responses were examined in relation to teacher reports of anxious-depressed symptoms and social worries at the end of the child's first school term. The role of earlier child behavioral inhibition and attachment, assessed at 14 months, was also considered. Compared to children of non-anxious mothers, children of mothers with social phobia were significantly more likely to give anxiously negative responses in their school DP (OR = 2.57). In turn, negative DP predicted teacher reported anxious-depressed and social worry problems. There were no effects of infant behavioral inhibition or attachment. Vulnerability in young children at risk of anxiety can be identified using Doll Play narratives.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 1%
Unknown 73 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 18%
Student > Master 12 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 10%
Unspecified 7 9%
Other 17 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 49 64%
Unspecified 11 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 9%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Other 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2016.
All research outputs
#1,153,813
of 8,272,014 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
#109
of 1,288 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,283
of 94,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
#3
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,272,014 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,288 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 94,946 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.