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Methylmercury degradation and exposure pathways in streams and wetlands impacted by historical mining

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, October 2016
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Title
Methylmercury degradation and exposure pathways in streams and wetlands impacted by historical mining
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.139
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrick M. Donovan, Joel D. Blum, Michael Bliss Singer, Mark Marvin-DiPasquale, Martin T.K. Tsui

Abstract

Monomethyl mercury (MMHg) and total mercury (THg) concentrations and Hg stable isotope ratios (δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg) were measured in sediment and aquatic organisms from Cache Creek (California Coast Range) and Yolo Bypass (Sacramento Valley). Cache Creek sediment had a large range in THg (87 to 3870ng/g) and δ(202)Hg (-1.69 to -0.20‰) reflecting the heterogeneity of Hg mining sources in sediment. The δ(202)Hg of Yolo Bypass wetland sediment suggests a mixture of high and low THg sediment sources. Relationships between %MMHg (the percent ratio of MMHg to THg) and Hg isotope values (δ(202)Hg and Δ(199)Hg) in fish and macroinvertebrates were used to identify and estimate the isotopic composition of MMHg. Deviation from linear relationships was found between %MMHg and Hg isotope values, which is indicative of the bioaccumulation of isotopically distinct pools of MMHg. The isotopic composition of pre-photodegraded MMHg (i.e., subtracting fractionation from photochemical reactions) was estimated and contrasting relationships were observed between the estimated δ(202)Hg of pre-photodegraded MMHg and sediment IHg. Cache Creek had mass dependent fractionation (MDF; δ(202)Hg) of at least -0.4‰ whereas Yolo Bypass had MDF of +0.2 to +0.5‰. This result supports the hypothesis that Hg isotope fractionation between IHg and MMHg observed in rivers (-MDF) is unique compared to +MDF observed in non-flowing water environments such as wetlands, lakes, and the coastal ocean.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 31 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Researcher 7 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Lecturer 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 11 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 24%
Engineering 2 6%
Unknown 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 May 2016.
All research outputs
#12,362,292
of 15,557,767 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#10,792
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,584
of 268,621 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#119
of 162 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,767 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,621 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 162 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.