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Components of Motor Deficiencies in ADHD and Possible Interventions

Overview of attention for article published in Neuroscience, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Components of Motor Deficiencies in ADHD and Possible Interventions
Published in
Neuroscience, May 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2016.05.040
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anat Dahan, Chen Hanna Ryder, Miriam Reiner

Abstract

There is a growing body of evidence pointing at several types of motor abnormalities found in ADHD. In this article we review findings stemming from different paradigms, and suggest an interweaving approach to the different stages involved in the motor regulation process. We start by reviewing various aspects of motor abnormalities found in ADHD and related brain mechanisms. Then, we classify reported motor impairments associated with ADHD, into four classes of motor stages: Attention to the task, motion preparation, motion execution and motion monitoring. Motor abnormalities and corresponding neural activations are analyzed in the context of each of the four identified motor patterns, along with the interactions among them and with other systems. Given the specifications and models of the role of the four motor impairments in ADHD, we ask what treatments correspond to the identified motor impairments. We analyze therapeutic interventions targeting motor difficulties most commonly experienced among individuals with ADHD; first, Neurofeedback training and EMG-biofeedback. As some of the identified components of attention, planning and monitoring have been shown to be linked to abnormal oscillation patterns in the brain, we examine neurofeedback interventions aimed to address these types of oscillations: Theta/beta frequency training and SCP neurofeedback targeted at elevating the CNV component. Additionally we discuss EMG-Biofeedback interventions targeted at feedback on motor activity. Further we review physical activity and motor interventions aimed at improving motor difficulties, associated with ADHD. These kinds of interventions are shown to be helpful not only in aspects of physical ability, but also in enhancing cognition and executive functioning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 20%
Other 12 17%
Student > Master 11 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Researcher 7 10%
Other 18 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 20%
Neuroscience 10 14%
Unspecified 8 12%
Sports and Recreations 5 7%
Other 12 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2018.
All research outputs
#3,800,749
of 13,010,971 outputs
Outputs from Neuroscience
#1,478
of 5,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,549
of 264,835 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuroscience
#44
of 149 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,010,971 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,745 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,835 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 149 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.