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‘Let’s Move It’ – a school-based multilevel intervention to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour among older adolescents in vocational secondary schools: a study protocol for a…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)

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16 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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188 Mendeley
Title
‘Let’s Move It’ – a school-based multilevel intervention to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour among older adolescents in vocational secondary schools: a study protocol for a cluster-randomised trial
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3094-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nelli Hankonen, Matti T. J. Heino, Vera Araujo-Soares, Falko F. Sniehotta, Reijo Sund, Tommi Vasankari, Pilvikki Absetz, Katja Borodulin, Antti Uutela, Taru Lintunen, Ari Haukkala

Abstract

Physical activity (PA) has been shown to decline during adolescence, and those with lower education have lower levels of activity already at this age, calling for targeted efforts for them. No previous study has demonstrated lasting effects of school-based PA interventions among older adolescents. Furthermore, these interventions have rarely targeted sedentary behaviour (SB) despite its relevance to health. The Let's Move It trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness and the cost-effectiveness of a school-based, multi-level intervention, on PA and SB, among vocational school students. We hypothesise that the intervention is effective in increasing moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA), particularly among those with low or moderate baseline levels, and decreasing SB among all students. The design is a cluster-randomised parallel group trial with an internal pilot study. The trial is conducted in six vocational schools in the Helsinki Metropolitan area, Finland. The intervention is carried out in 30 intervention classes, and 27 control classes retain the standard curriculum. The randomisation occurs at school-level to avoid contamination and to aid delivery. Three of the six schools, randomly allocated, receive the 'Let's Move It' intervention which consists of 1) group sessions and poster campaign targeting students' autonomous PA motivation and self-regulation skills, 2) sitting reduction in classrooms via alterations in choice architecture and teacher behaviour, and 3) enhancement of PA opportunities in school, home and community environments. At baseline, student participants are blind to group allocation. The trial is carried out in six batches in 2015-2017, with main measurements at pre-intervention baseline, and 2-month and 14-month follow-ups. Primary outcomes are for PA, MVPA measured by accelerometry and self-report, and for SB, sedentary time and breaks in sedentary time (accelerometry). Key secondary outcomes include measured body composition, self-reported well-being, and psychological variables. Process variables include measures of psychosocial determinants of PA (e.g. autonomous motivation) and use of behaviour change techniques. Process evaluation also includes qualitative interviews. Intervention fidelity is monitored. The study will establish whether the Let's Move It intervention is effective in increasing PA and reducing SB in vocational school students, and identify key processes explaining the results. ISRCTN10979479 . Registered: 31.12.2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 188 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 185 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 44 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 16%
Researcher 22 12%
Student > Bachelor 19 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 6%
Other 30 16%
Unknown 30 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 34 18%
Psychology 29 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 27 14%
Sports and Recreations 25 13%
Social Sciences 12 6%
Other 20 11%
Unknown 41 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,553,483
of 14,020,343 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,848
of 9,638 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,649
of 265,694 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,020,343 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,638 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,694 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them