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Microbial dinitrogen fixation in coral holobionts exposed to thermal stress and bleaching

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Microbiology, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
Microbial dinitrogen fixation in coral holobionts exposed to thermal stress and bleaching
Published in
Environmental Microbiology, June 2016
DOI 10.1111/1462-2920.13385
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ulisse Cardini, Nanne van Hoytema, Vanessa N. Bednarz, Laura Rix, Rachel A. Foster, Mamoon M. D. Al-Rshaidat, Christian Wild

Abstract

Coral holobionts (i.e., coral-algal-prokaryote symbioses) exhibit dissimilar thermal sensitivities that may determine which coral species will adapt to global warming. Nonetheless, studies simultaneously investigating the effects of warming on all holobiont members are lacking. Here we show that exposure to increased temperature affects key physiological traits of all members (herein: animal host, zooxanthellae and diazotrophs) of both Stylophora pistillata and Acropora hemprichii during and after thermal stress. S. pistillata experienced severe loss of zooxanthellae (i.e., bleaching) with no net photosynthesis at the end of the experiment. Conversely, A. hemprichii was more resilient to thermal stress. Exposure to increased temperature (+6°C) resulted in a drastic increase in daylight dinitrogen (N2 ) fixation, particularly in A. hemprichii (3-fold compared to controls). After the temperature was reduced again to in situ levels, diazotrophs exhibited a reversed diel pattern of activity, with increased N2 fixation rates recorded only in the dark, particularly in bleached S. pistillata (2-fold compared to controls). Concurrently, both animal hosts, but particularly bleached S. pistillata, reduced both organic matter release and heterotrophic feeding on picoplankton. Our findings indicate that physiological plasticity by coral-associated diazotrophs may play an important role in determining the response of coral holobionts to ocean warming. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
Saudi Arabia 1 2%
Unknown 55 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 32%
Student > Master 13 23%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Unspecified 6 11%
Other 5 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 37%
Environmental Science 16 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 19%
Unspecified 8 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2017.
All research outputs
#493,075
of 12,348,046 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Microbiology
#83
of 2,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,127
of 274,872 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Microbiology
#10
of 143 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,348,046 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,625 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,872 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 143 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.