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Prospective Evaluation of Mental Health and Deployment Experience Among Women in the US Military

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Epidemiology, July 2012
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Title
Prospective Evaluation of Mental Health and Deployment Experience Among Women in the US Military
Published in
American Journal of Epidemiology, July 2012
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwr496
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. D. Seelig, I. G. Jacobson, B. Smith, T. I. Hooper, G. D. Gackstetter, M. A. K. Ryan, T. S. Wells, S. MacDermid Wadsworth, T. C. Smith

Abstract

Previous research has shown that military women often experience potentially severe health outcomes following deployment. Data from the Millennium Cohort Study, a 21-year longitudinal study examining the health effects of military service, were used to examine this issue. In longitudinal analyses (2001-2008) carried out among US military women (n = 17,481), the authors examined positive screens for depression, anxiety, panic, and posttraumatic stress disorder in relation to deployment in support of the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, while adjusting for relevant baseline and time-varying covariates. Women who were deployed and reported combat-related exposures had greater odds than nondeployed women of reporting symptoms of a mental health condition (odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval: 1.65, 2.20), after adjustment for demographic, military, and behavioral covariates. In addition, higher stress, problem drinking, and a history of mental illness were significantly associated with increased risk of later mental health conditions. In contrast, women in the Reserves or National Guard and those with higher education were at decreased risk of mental health conditions (all P 's < 0.01). As the roles and responsibilities of women in the military expand and deployments continue, designing better prevention and recovery strategies specifically for women are critical for overall force health protection and readiness.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 50 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 25%
Unspecified 8 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 9%
Researcher 4 8%
Other 15 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 28%
Psychology 11 21%
Unspecified 9 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Social Sciences 4 8%
Other 10 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2012.
All research outputs
#9,619,872
of 12,023,533 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Epidemiology
#6,544
of 7,038 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,370
of 112,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Epidemiology
#47
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,023,533 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,038 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.