↓ Skip to main content

Diversification of a Food-Mimicking Male Ornament via Sensory Drive

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, August 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
88 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Diversification of a Food-Mimicking Male Ornament via Sensory Drive
Published in
Current Biology, August 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2012.05.050
Pubmed ID
Authors

Niclas Kolm, Mirjam Amcoff, Richard P. Mann, Göran Arnqvist

Abstract

The evolutionary divergence of sexual signals is often important during the formation of new animal species, but our understanding of the origin of signal diversity is limited [1, 2]. Sensory drive, the optimization of communication signal efficiency through matching to the local environment, has been highlighted as a potential promoter of diversification and speciation [3]. The swordtail characin (Corynopoma riisei) is a tropical fish in which males display a flag-like ornament that elicits female foraging behavior during courtship. We show that the shape of the male ornament covaries with female diet across natural populations. More specifically, natural populations in which the female diet is more dominated by ants exhibit male ornaments more similar to the shape of an ant. Feeding experiments confirm that females habituated to a diet of ants prefer to bite at male ornaments from populations with a diet more dominated by ants. Our results show that the male ornament functions as a "fishing lure" that is diversifying in shape to match local variation in female search images employed during foraging. This direct link between variation in female feeding ecology and the evolutionary diversification of male sexual ornaments suggests that sensory drive may be a common engine of signal divergence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Brazil 1 1%
Finland 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 83 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 34%
Student > Bachelor 16 18%
Researcher 13 15%
Student > Master 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 15 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 66 75%
Unspecified 10 11%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 1%
Other 1 1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 36. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2015.
All research outputs
#384,011
of 12,240,493 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#1,509
of 9,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,130
of 116,713 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#16
of 123 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,240,493 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,196 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 38.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 116,713 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 123 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.