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Electrophysiological Studies of Face Perception in Humans

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, November 1996
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
patent
14 patents
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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2071 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
929 Mendeley
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Title
Electrophysiological Studies of Face Perception in Humans
Published in
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, November 1996
DOI 10.1162/jocn.1996.8.6.551
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shlomo Bentin, Truett Allison, Aina Puce, Erik Perez, Gregory McCarthy

Abstract

Event-related potentials (ERPs) associated with face perception were recorded with scalp electrodes from normal volunteers. Subjects performed a visual target detection task in which they mentally counted the number of occurrences of pictorial stimuli from a designated category such us butterflies. In separate experiments, target stimuli were embedded within a series of other stimuli including unfamiliar human faces and isolated face components, inverted faces, distorted faces, animal faces, and other nonface stimuli. Unman faces evoked a negative potential at 172 msec (N170), which was absent from the ERPs elicited by other animate and inanimate nonface stimuli. N170 was largest over the posterior temporal scalp and was larger over the right than the left hemisphere. N170 was delayed when faces were presented upside-down, but its amplitude did not change. When presented in isolation, eyes elicited an N170 that was significantly larger than that elicited by whole faces, while noses and lips elicited small negative ERPs about 50 msec later than N170. Distorted human faces, in which the locations of inner face components were altered, elicited an N170 similar in amplitude to that elicited by normal faces. However, faces of animals, human hands, cars, and items of furniture did not evoke N170. N170 may reflect the operation of a neural mechanism tuned to detect (as opposed to identify) human faces, similar to the "structural encoder" suggested by Bruce and Young (1986). A similar function has been proposed for the face-selective N200 ERP recorded from the middle fusiform and posterior inferior temporal gyri using subdural electrodes in humans (Allison, McCarthy, Nobre, Puce, & Belger, 1994c). However, the differential sensitivity of N170 to eyes in isolation suggests that N170 may reflect the activation of an eye-sensitive region of cortex. The voltage distribution of N170 over the scalp is consistent with a neural generator located in the occipitotemporal sulcus lateral to the fusiform/inferior temporal region that generates N200.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 929 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 18 2%
United Kingdom 12 1%
Germany 8 <1%
Canada 7 <1%
Italy 4 <1%
Portugal 3 <1%
France 3 <1%
Hungary 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Other 21 2%
Unknown 849 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 244 26%
Researcher 154 17%
Student > Master 139 15%
Student > Bachelor 111 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 58 6%
Other 148 16%
Unknown 75 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 478 51%
Neuroscience 119 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 66 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 42 5%
Computer Science 23 2%
Other 69 7%
Unknown 132 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2018.
All research outputs
#829,562
of 13,385,815 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
#167
of 1,688 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,139
of 121,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
#4
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,385,815 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,688 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 121,590 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.