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The impact of patient co-morbidities on the regenerative capacity of cardiac explant-derived stem cells

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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40 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of patient co-morbidities on the regenerative capacity of cardiac explant-derived stem cells
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13287-016-0321-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Audrey E. Mayfield, Megan E. Fitzpatrick, Nicholas Latham, Everad L. Tilokee, Melanie Villanueva, Seth Mount, Bu-Khanh Lam, Marc Ruel, Duncan J. Stewart, Darryl R. Davis, Mayfield, Audrey E, Fitzpatrick, Megan E, Latham, Nicholas, Tilokee, Everad L, Villanueva, Melanie, Mount, Seth, Lam, Bu-Khanh, Ruel, Marc, Stewart, Duncan J, Davis, Darryl R

Abstract

Although patient-sourced cardiac stem cells repair damaged myocardium, the extent to which medical co-morbidities influence cardiac-derived cell products is uncertain. Therefore, we investigated the influence of atherosclerotic risk factors on the regenerative performance of human cardiac explant-derived cells (EDCs). In this study, the Long Term Stratification for survivors of acute coronary syndromes model was used to quantify the burden of cardiovascular risk factors within a group of patients with established atherosclerosis. EDCs were cultured from human atrial appendages and injected into immunodeficient mice 7 days post-left coronary ligation. Cytokine arrays and enzyme linked immunoassays were used to determine the release of cytokines by EDCs in vitro, and echocardiography was used to determine regenerative capabilities in vivo. EDCs sourced from patients with more cardiovascular risk factors demonstrated a negative correlation with production of pro-healing cytokines (such as stromal cell derived factor 1α) and exosomes which had negative effects on the promotion of angiogenesis and chemotaxis. Reductions in exosomes and pro-healing cytokines with accumulating medical co-morbidities were associated with increases in production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) by EDCs. Increased patient co-morbidities were also correlated with significant attenuation in improvements of left ventricular ejection fraction. The regenerative performance of the earliest precursor cell population cultured from human explant tissue declines with accumulating medical co-morbidities. This effect is associated with diminished production of pro-cardiogenic cytokines and exosomes while IL-6 is markedly increased. Predictors of cardiac events demonstrated a lower capacity to support angiogenesis and repair injured myocardium in a mouse model of myocardial infarction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Mathematics 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 8 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2016.
All research outputs
#1,732,565
of 7,909,849 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#196
of 617 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,039
of 269,984 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#11
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,909,849 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 617 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,984 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.