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Mental Health and Comorbidities in U.S. Military Members

Overview of attention for article published in Military Medicine, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
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Title
Mental Health and Comorbidities in U.S. Military Members
Published in
Military Medicine, June 2016
DOI 10.7205/milmed-d-15-00187
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nancy F. Crum-Cianflone, Teresa M. Powell, Cynthia A. LeardMann, Dale W. Russell, Edward J. Boyko

Abstract

Using data from a prospective cohort study of U.S. service members who joined after September 11, 2001 to determine incidence rates and comorbidities of mental and behavioral disorders. Calculated age and sex adjusted incidence rates of mental and behavioral conditions determined by validated instruments and electronic medical records. Of 10,671 service members, 3,379 (32%) deployed between baseline and follow-up, of whom 49% reported combat experience. Combat deployers had highest incidence rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (25 cases/1,000 person-years [PY]), panic/anxiety (21/1,000 PY), and any mental disorder (34/1,000 PY). Nondeployers had substantial rates of mental conditions (11, 13, and 18 cases/1,000 PY). Among combat deployers, 12% screened positive for mental disorder, 59% binge drinking, 16% alcohol problem, 19% cigarette smoking, and 20% smokeless tobacco at follow-up. Of those with recent PTSD, 73% concurrently developed >1 incident mental or behavioral conditions. Of those screening positive for PTSD, 11% had electronic medical record diagnosis. U.S. service members joining during recent conflicts experienced high rates of mental and behavioral disorders. Highest rates were among combat deployers. Most cases were not represented in medical codes, suggesting targeted interventions are needed to address the burden of mental disorders among service members and Veterans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 22%
Researcher 3 17%
Unspecified 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Other 5 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 22%
Unspecified 3 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 6%
Other 3 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2018.
All research outputs
#3,488,011
of 12,755,705 outputs
Outputs from Military Medicine
#269
of 1,343 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,842
of 264,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Military Medicine
#3
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,755,705 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,343 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,314 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.