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Displacement and force distribution of splinted and tilted mandibular anterior teeth under occlusal loads: an in silico 3D finite element analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Progress in Orthodontics, June 2016
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Title
Displacement and force distribution of splinted and tilted mandibular anterior teeth under occlusal loads: an in silico 3D finite element analysis
Published in
Progress in Orthodontics, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40510-016-0129-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Allahyar Gerami, Sepideh Dadgar, Vahid Rakhshan, Puya Jannati, Farhad Sobouti

Abstract

Fixed orthodontic retainers have numerous advantages, but it is not known whether they can exert pathological forces on supporting tissues around the splinted teeth. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the inclination of the lower anterior teeth can affect dental displacement and also change the direction of occlusal loads exerted to dental and its supporting tissues. Four three-dimensional finite element models of the anterior part of the mandible were designed. All the models contained the incisors and canines, their periodontal ligament layers (PDLs), the supporting bone (both spongy and cortical), and a pentaflex splinting wire placed in the lingual side of the teeth. Teeth inclination was considered to be 80° (model 1), 90° (model 2), 100° (model 3), and 110° (model 4) to the horizontal plane. The lower incisors were loaded with a 187-N vertical force. Their displacement patterns and the stress in their PDLs were evaluated. In incisors with 80° of inclination, less than a 0.1-mm lingual displacement was seen on the incisal edge and a similar distance of displacement towards the labial was seen on their root apices. However, in models with 90°-110° of inclination, the incisal edge displaced labially between about 0.01 and 0.45 mm, while root apices displaced lingually instead. By increasing the angle of the teeth, the strain in the periodontal ligament increased from about 37 to 58 mJ. The von Mises stresses around the cervical and apical areas differed for each tooth and each model, without a similar pattern. Increasing the angle of the teeth resulted in much higher cervical stresses in the incisors, but not in the canines. In the lateral incisor, cervical stress increased until 100° of inclination but reduced to about half by increasing the angle to 110°. Apical stress increased rather consistently in the incisor and lateral incisors, by increasing the inclination. However, in the canines, apical stress reduced to about half, from the first to fourth models. Increasing the labial inclination can mostly harm the central incisors, followed by the lateral incisors. This finding warns against long durations of splinting in patients with higher and/or patients with reduced labial bone thickness.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Researcher 4 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 47%
Engineering 5 15%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 9 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 June 2016.
All research outputs
#5,672,798
of 7,847,043 outputs
Outputs from Progress in Orthodontics
#85
of 119 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,676
of 269,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Progress in Orthodontics
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,847,043 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 119 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.