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Pre-pubertal males practising Taekwondo exhibit favourable postural and neuromuscular performance

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, June 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Pre-pubertal males practising Taekwondo exhibit favourable postural and neuromuscular performance
Published in
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13102-016-0040-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mohamed Chedly Jlid, Nicola Maffulli, Nisar Souissi, Mohamed Souheil Chelly, Thierry Paillard, Jlid, Mohamed Chedly, Maffulli, Nicola, Souissi, Nisar, Chelly, Mohamed Souheil, Paillard, Thierry

Abstract

The postural and neuromuscular performances in healthy children taekwondo (TKD) practitioners in comparison with control children were examined. Seventeen healthy pre-pubertal males undertaking only physical education at school (age: 11.88 ± 0.33 years) and 12 pre-pubertal male TKD practitioners (>3 years, 4 sessions a week) (age 11.66 ± 0.49 years) were recruited. Performances in the dynamic postural control (Star Excursion Balance Test -SEBT), vertical jump [squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ)] and sprint running (distances: 5, 10, 20 and 30 m) tests were compared between the two groups. The performances of the TKD practitioners were better than those of the non-TKD active for the SEBT (for 14 of 16 conditions, p < 0.05), SJ (p < 0.01), CMJ (p < 0.03) sprint running (5 m, p < 0.01; 10 m, p < 0.04; the performances for the 20 and 30 m sprints were not significant, p > 0.05). TKD practice would stimulate sensory input and motor output of the postural system that would enhance its efficiency. In addition, the dynamic nature of TKD would develop the muscle power of the lower limbs. In our sample of healthy pre-pubertal males, TKD appears to improve postural and neuromuscular functions, but further research is required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 27%
Professor 5 17%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 14 47%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 5 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2016.
All research outputs
#3,015,711
of 11,342,318 outputs
Outputs from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#90
of 167 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,414
of 277,799 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,342,318 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 167 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,799 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.