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Variation in the major histocompatibility complex [MHC] gene family in schizophrenia: Associations and functional implications

Overview of attention for article published in Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, April 2013
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Title
Variation in the major histocompatibility complex [MHC] gene family in schizophrenia: Associations and functional implications
Published in
Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, April 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2012.07.009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Monojit Debnath, Dara M. Cannon, Ganesan Venkatasubramanian

Abstract

Schizophrenia is a chronic debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder with a complex genetic contribution. Although multiple genetic, immunological and environmental factors are known to contribute to schizophrenia susceptibility, the underlying neurobiological mechanism(s) is yet to be established. The immune system dysfunction theory of schizophrenia is experiencing a period of renewal due to a growth in evidence implicating components of the immune system in brain function and human behavior. Current evidence indicates that certain immune molecules such as Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and cytokines, the key regulators of immunity and inflammation are directly involved in the neurobiological processes related to neurodevelopment, neuronal plasticity, learning, memory and behavior. However, the strongest support in favor of the immune hypothesis has recently emerged from on-going genome wide association studies advocating MHC region variants as major determinants of one's risk for developing schizophrenia. Further identification of the interacting partners and receptors of MHC molecules in the brain and their role in down-stream signaling pathways of neurotransmission have implicated these molecules as potential schizophrenia risk factors. More recently, combined brain imaging and genetic studies have revealed a relationship between genetic variations within the MHC region and neuromorphometric changes during schizophrenia. Furthermore, MHC molecules play a significant role in the immune-infective and neurodevelopmental pathogenetic pathways, currently hypothesized to contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Herein, we review the immunological, genetic and expression studies assessing the role of the MHC in conferring risk for developing schizophrenia, we summarize and discuss the possible mechanisms involved, making note of the challenges to, and future directions of, immunogenetic research in schizophrenia.

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The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 102 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 18%
Student > Bachelor 15 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Researcher 11 10%
Student > Postgraduate 8 8%
Other 23 22%
Unknown 14 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 24%
Psychology 13 12%
Neuroscience 11 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 5%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 14 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2012.
All research outputs
#9,780,563
of 12,240,493 outputs
Outputs from Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
#1,261
of 1,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,714
of 117,450 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
#11
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,240,493 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,657 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 117,450 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.