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High Nitrate Concentrations in Some Midwest United States Streams in 2013 after the 2012 Drought

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Quality, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#39 of 2,656)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
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Title
High Nitrate Concentrations in Some Midwest United States Streams in 2013 after the 2012 Drought
Published in
Journal of Environmental Quality, September 2016
DOI 10.2134/jeq2015.12.0591
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter C. Van Metre, Jeffrey W. Frey, MaryLynn Musgrove, Naomi Nakagaki, Sharon Qi, Barbara J. Mahler, Michael E. Wieczorek, Daniel T. Button

Abstract

Nitrogen sources in the Mississippi River basin have been linked to degradation of stream ecology and to Gulf of Mexico hypoxia. In 2013, the USGS and the USEPA characterized water quality stressors and ecological conditions in 100 wadeable streams across the midwestern United States. Wet conditions in 2013 followed a severe drought in 2012, a weather pattern associated with elevated nitrogen concentrations and loads in streams. Nitrate concentrations during the May to August 2013 sampling period ranged from <0.04 to 41.8 mg L as N (mean, 5.31 mg L). Observed mean May to June nitrate concentrations at the 100 sites were compared with May to June concentrations predicted from a regression model developed using historical nitrate data. Observed concentrations for 17 sites, centered on Iowa and southern Minnesota, were outside the 95% confidence interval of the regression-predicted mean, indicating that they were anomalously high. The sites with a nitrate anomaly had significantly higher May to June nitrate concentrations than sites without an anomaly (means, 19.8 and 3.6 mg L, respectively) and had higher antecedent precipitation indices, a measure of the departure from normal precipitation, in 2012 and 2013. Correlations between nitrate concentrations and watershed characteristics and nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate indicated that fertilizer and manure used in crop production, principally corn, were the dominant sources of nitrate. The anomalously high nitrate levels in parts of the Midwest in 2013 coincide with reported higher-than-normal nitrate loads in the Mississippi River.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 6%
Unknown 61 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 28%
Student > Master 16 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Other 4 6%
Student > Bachelor 3 5%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 6 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 22 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 29%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 11%
Engineering 4 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 10 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 October 2019.
All research outputs
#673,779
of 20,957,071 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Quality
#39
of 2,656 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,760
of 280,040 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Quality
#8
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,957,071 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,656 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,040 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.