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The evolution of scale sensilla in the transition from land to sea in elapid snakes

Overview of attention for article published in Open Biology, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 608)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
25 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
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Title
The evolution of scale sensilla in the transition from land to sea in elapid snakes
Published in
Open Biology, June 2016
DOI 10.1098/rsob.160054
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jenna M. Crowe-Riddell, Edward P. Snelling, Amy P. Watson, Anton Kyuseop Suh, Julian C. Partridge, Kate L. Sanders

Abstract

Scale sensilla are small tactile mechanosensory organs located on the head scales of many squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes). In sea snakes and sea kraits (Elapidae: Hydrophiinae), these scale organs are presumptive scale sensilla that purportedly function as both tactile mechanoreceptors and potentially as hydrodynamic receptors capable of sensing the displacement of water. We combined scanning electron microscopy, silicone casting of the skin and quadrate sampling with a phylogenetic analysis to assess morphological variation in sensilla on the postocular head scale(s) across four terrestrial, 13 fully aquatic and two semi-aquatic species of elapids. Substantial variation exists in the overall coverage of sensilla (0.8-6.5%) among the species sampled and is broadly overlapping in aquatic and terrestrial lineages. However, two observations suggest a divergent, possibly hydrodynamic sensory role of sensilla in sea snake and sea krait species. First, scale sensilla are more protruding (dome-shaped) in aquatic species than in their terrestrial counterparts. Second, exceptionally high overall coverage of sensilla is found only in the fully aquatic sea snakes, and this attribute appears to have evolved multiple times within this group. Our quantification of coverage as a proxy for relative 'sensitivity' represents the first analysis of the evolution of sensilla in the transition from terrestrial to marine habitats. However, evidence from physiological and behavioural studies is needed to confirm the functional role of scale sensilla in sea snakes and sea kraits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 6%
United States 1 3%
Mexico 1 3%
Unknown 32 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Researcher 6 17%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 78%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Unknown 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 190. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2019.
All research outputs
#74,606
of 13,927,844 outputs
Outputs from Open Biology
#4
of 608 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,925
of 265,096 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Open Biology
#1
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,927,844 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 608 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,096 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.