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Homo floresiensis-like fossils from the early Middle Pleistocene of Flores

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
213 news outlets
blogs
18 blogs
twitter
204 tweeters
facebook
14 Facebook pages
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
141 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Homo floresiensis-like fossils from the early Middle Pleistocene of Flores
Published in
Nature, June 2016
DOI 10.1038/nature17999
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gerrit D. van den Bergh, Yousuke Kaifu, Iwan Kurniawan, Reiko T. Kono, Adam Brumm, Erick Setiyabudi, Fachroel Aziz, Michael J. Morwood, van den Bergh, Gerrit D, Kaifu, Yousuke, Kurniawan, Iwan, Kono, Reiko T, Brumm, Adam, Setiyabudi, Erick, Aziz, Fachroel, Morwood, Michael J

Abstract

The evolutionary origin of Homo floresiensis, a diminutive hominin species previously known only by skeletal remains from Liang Bua in western Flores, Indonesia, has been intensively debated. It is a matter of controversy whether this primitive form, dated to the Late Pleistocene, evolved from early Asian Homo erectus and represents a unique and striking case of evolutionary reversal in hominin body and brain size within an insular environment. The alternative hypothesis is that H. floresiensis derived from an older, smaller-brained member of our genus, such as Homo habilis, or perhaps even late Australopithecus, signalling a hitherto undocumented dispersal of hominins from Africa into eastern Asia by two million years ago (2 Ma). Here we describe hominin fossils excavated in 2014 from an early Middle Pleistocene site (Mata Menge) in the So'a Basin of central Flores. These specimens comprise a mandible fragment and six isolated teeth belonging to at least three small-jawed and small-toothed individuals. Dating to ~0.7 Ma, these fossils now constitute the oldest hominin remains from Flores. The Mata Menge mandible and teeth are similar in dimensions and morphological characteristics to those of H. floresiensis from Liang Bua. The exception is the mandibular first molar, which retains a more primitive condition. Notably, the Mata Menge mandible and molar are even smaller in size than those of the two existing H. floresiensis individuals from Liang Bua. The Mata Menge fossils are derived compared with Australopithecus and H. habilis, and so tend to support the view that H. floresiensis is a dwarfed descendent of early Asian H. erectus. Our findings suggest that hominins on Flores had acquired extremely small body size and other morphological traits specific to H. floresiensis at an unexpectedly early time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 204 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 141 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 4%
Hong Kong 2 1%
Japan 2 1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 2 1%
Unknown 124 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 23%
Researcher 27 19%
Student > Master 19 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 9 6%
Other 35 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 45 32%
Social Sciences 20 14%
Arts and Humanities 19 13%
Unspecified 11 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 8%
Other 35 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1959. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2018.
All research outputs
#575
of 11,841,418 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#113
of 60,498 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29
of 277,543 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#5
of 982 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,841,418 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 60,498 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 72.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,543 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 982 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.