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A novel method of selective removal of human DNA improves PCR sensitivity for detection of Salmonella Typhi in blood samples

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
patent
1 patent

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
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Title
A novel method of selective removal of human DNA improves PCR sensitivity for detection of Salmonella Typhi in blood samples
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2334-12-164
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liqing Zhou, Andrew J Pollard

Abstract

Enteric fever is a major public health problem, causing an estimated 21million new cases and 216,000 or more deaths every year. Current diagnosis of the disease is inadequate. Blood culture only identifies 45 to 70% of the cases and is time-consuming. Serological tests have very low sensitivity and specificity. Clinical samples obtained for diagnosis of enteric fever in the field generally have <1 organism/ml of blood, so that even PCR-based methods, widely used for detection of other infectious diseases, are not a straightforward option in typhoid diagnosis. We developed a novel method to enrich target bacterial DNA by selective removal of human DNA from blood samples, enhancing the sensitivity of PCR tests. This method offers the possibility of improving PCR assays directly using clinical specimens for diagnosis of this globally important infectious disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Luxembourg 1 1%
Unknown 84 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 30%
Researcher 23 26%
Student > Postgraduate 9 10%
Student > Master 8 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 14 16%
Unknown 1 1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 46%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 11 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 3 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2019.
All research outputs
#2,698,400
of 14,526,769 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#864
of 5,399 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,626
of 124,203 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,526,769 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,399 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 124,203 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them