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The epidemiology of patellar luxation in dogs attending primary-care veterinary practices in England

Overview of attention for article published in Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, June 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

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55 Mendeley
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Title
The epidemiology of patellar luxation in dogs attending primary-care veterinary practices in England
Published in
Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40575-016-0034-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dan G. O’Neill, Richard L. Meeson, Adam Sheridan, David B. Church, Dave C. Brodbelt

Abstract

Canine patellar luxation is one of the most common orthopaedic disorders of dogs and is a potential welfare concern because it can lead to lameness, osteoarthritis and pain. However, there are limited epidemiological data on the disorder relating to the general population of dogs in England. This study aimed to investigate the VetCompass Programme database of dogs attending primary-care veterinary practices in England to report on the prevalence, risk factors and clinical management of diagnosed patellar luxation cases. The study included all dogs with at least one electronic patient record in the VetCompass database from September 1(st), 2009 to August 31(st), 2014. Candidate patellar luxation cases were identified using free-text word searching of the clinical notes and VeNom diagnosis term fields. Univariable and multivariable binary logistic regression modelling was used for risk factor analysis. The overall dataset comprised 210,824 dogs attending 119 clinics in England. The prevalence of patellar luxation diagnosis in dogs was 1.30 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.21-1.39). Of the 751 incident cases, 293 (39.0 %) received medical management, 99 (13.2 %) received surgical intervention and 28 (3.7 %) were referred for further management. Multivariable modelling documented 11 breeds with increased odds of patellar luxation compared with crossbred dogs, including the Pomeranian (odds ratio [OR]: 6.5, 95 % CI 4.0-10.7, P < 0.001), Chihuahua (OR: 5.9, 95 % CI 4.4-7.9, P < 0.001), Yorkshire Terrier (OR: 5.5, 95 % CI 4.3-7.1, P < 0.001) and French Bulldog (OR: 5.4, 95 % CI 3.1-9.3, P < 0.001). Dogs with bodyweight below their mean for breed and sex had a 1.4 times odds of diagnosis (95 % CI 1.2-1.6, P < 0.001). Dogs aged ≥ 12.0 years showed 0.4 times the odds (95 % CI 0.3-0.5, P < 0.001) compared with dogs aged < 3.0 years. Females had 1.3 times the odds (95 % CI 1.1-1.5, P < 0.001), neutered dogs had 2.4 times the odds (95 % CI 1.8-3.2, P < 0.001) and insured dogs had 1.9 times the odds (95 % CI 1.6-2.3, P < 0.001). Patellar luxation warrants inclusion as a welfare priority in dogs and control strategies that include this disorder should be considered as worthwhile breeding goals, especially in predisposed breeds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 18%
Other 9 16%
Student > Master 8 15%
Researcher 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 29 53%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Engineering 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,105,915
of 11,349,388 outputs
Outputs from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#39
of 56 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,510
of 277,050 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canine Genetics and Epidemiology
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,349,388 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 56 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 52.6. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,050 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.