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Effects of CXCR4 siRNA/dextran-spermine nanoparticles on CXCR4 expression and serum LDH levels in a mouse model of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver.

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Management and Research, December 2010
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1 tweeter

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Title
Effects of CXCR4 siRNA/dextran-spermine nanoparticles on CXCR4 expression and serum LDH levels in a mouse model of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver.
Published in
Cancer Management and Research, December 2010
DOI 10.2147/cmr.s11678
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abedini F, Ismail M, Hosseinkhani H, Ibrahim TA, Omar AR, Chong PP, Bejo MH, Domb AJ

Abstract

Liver metastasis is the main cause of mortality related to colorectal cancer. CXCR4 is necessary for the outgrowth of colon cancer micrometastases. In oncology, it has been demonstrated that several human tumors release lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into the circulation. CXCR4 gene expression and serum LDH levels are often increased in patients with colorectal cancer. Despite technological advances in cancer therapy, five-year overall survival is still around 50%. Therefore, better treatment needs to be developed. RNA interference (RNAi) is a modern and powerful tool for inhibition of gene expression. However, the rate-limiting step in this technology is effective delivery of RNAi agents. We have investigated a novel strategy of CXCR4 siRNA therapy and its effect on serum LDH levels in a BALB/C mouse model of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver. Hepatic metastasis was established by injecting a CT26.WT mouse colon carcinoma cell line via the tail vein. Our results demonstrated that CXCR4 siRNA/ dextran-spermine nanoparticles achieved high silencing efficiency with low toxicity. Favorable localization of the nanoparticles was confirmed with CXCR4 gene expression in the liver, that was correlated with serum LDH levels. More research will be needed to determine the effect of CXCR4 silencing on serum LDH levels, which may be a useful marker for predicting liver metastasis in colorectal cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 28 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 24%
Student > Master 4 14%
Researcher 3 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Professor 1 3%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 7 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 21%
Chemistry 5 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 7 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2011.
All research outputs
#3,107,593
of 4,506,762 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Management and Research
#75
of 108 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,900
of 75,175 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Management and Research
#12
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,506,762 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 108 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.