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Of mice and monkeys: using non-human primate models to bridge mouse- and human-based investigations of autism spectrum disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, July 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
140 Mendeley
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Title
Of mice and monkeys: using non-human primate models to bridge mouse- and human-based investigations of autism spectrum disorders
Published in
Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, July 2012
DOI 10.1186/1866-1955-4-21
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karli K Watson, Michael L Platt

Abstract

The autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) arise from a diverse array of genetic and environmental origins that disrupt the typical developmental trajectory of neural connectivity and synaptogenesis. ASDs are marked by dysfunctional social behavior and cognition, among other deficits. Greater understanding of the biological substrates of typical social behavior in animal models will further our understanding of the etiology of ASDs. Despite the precision and tractability of molecular genetics models of ASDs in rodents, these organisms lack the complexity of human social behavior, thus limiting their impact on understanding ASDs to basic mechanisms. Non-human primates (NHPs) provide an attractive, complementary model for ASDs, due in part to the complexity and dynamics of social structures, reliance on vision for social signaling, and deep homology in brain circuitry mediating social behavior and reward. This knowledge is based on a rich literature, compiled over 50 years of observing primate behavior in the wild, which, in the case of rhesus macaques, is complemented by a large body of research characterizing neuronal activity during cognitive behavior. Several recent developments in this field are directly relevant to ASDs, including how the brain represents the perceptual features of social stimuli, how social information influences attention processes in the brain, and how the value of social interaction is computed. Because the symptoms of ASDs may represent extreme manifestations of traits that vary in intensity within the general population, we will additionally discuss ways in which nonhuman primates also show variation in social behavior and reward sensitivity. In cases where variation in species-typical behavior is analogous to similar variations in human behavior, we believe that study of the neural circuitry underlying this variation will provide important insights into the systems-level mechanisms contributing to ASD pathology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 134 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 33 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 19%
Student > Bachelor 25 18%
Student > Master 14 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 22 16%
Unknown 11 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 24%
Psychology 29 21%
Neuroscience 27 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 5%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 15 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2016.
All research outputs
#1,242,752
of 9,782,339 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#57
of 243 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,401
of 101,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,782,339 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 243 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 101,109 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.