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Revisiting the paradigm of silica pathogenicity with synthetic quartz crystals: the role of crystallinity and surface disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Particle and Fibre Toxicology, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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2 tweeters

Citations

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38 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
Revisiting the paradigm of silica pathogenicity with synthetic quartz crystals: the role of crystallinity and surface disorder
Published in
Particle and Fibre Toxicology, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12989-016-0136-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesco Turci, Cristina Pavan, Riccardo Leinardi, Maura Tomatis, Linda Pastero, David Garry, Sergio Anguissola, Dominique Lison, Bice Fubini

Abstract

Exposure to some - but not all - quartz particles is associated to silicosis, lung cancer and autoimmune diseases. What imparts pathogenicity to any single quartz source is however still unclear. Crystallinity and various surface features are implied in toxicity. Quartz dusts used so far in particle toxicology have been obtained by grinding rocks containing natural quartz, a process which affects crystallinity and yields dusts with variable surface states. To clarify the role of crystallinity in quartz pathogenicity we have grown intact quartz crystals in respirable size. Quartz crystals were grown and compared with a fractured specimen obtained by grinding the largest synthetic crystals and a mineral quartz (positive control). The key physico-chemical features relevant to particle toxicity - particle size distribution, micromorphology, crystallinity, surface charge, cell-free oxidative potential - were evaluated. Membranolysis was assessed on biological and artificial membranes. Endpoints of cellular stress were evaluated on RAW 264.7 murine macrophages by High Content Analysis after ascertaining cellular uptake by bio-TEM imaging of quartz-exposed cells. Quartz crystals were grown in the submicron (n-Qz-syn) or micron (μ-Qz-syn) range by modulating the synthetic procedure. Independently from size as-grown quartz crystals with regular intact faces did not elicit cellular toxicity and lysosomal stress on RAW 264.7 macrophages, and were non-membranolytic on liposome and red blood cells. When fractured, synthetic quartz (μ-Qz-syn-f) attained particle morphology and size close to the mineral quartz dust (Qz-f, positive control) and similarly induced cellular toxicity and membranolysis. Fracturing imparted a higher heterogeneity of silanol acidic sites and radical species at the quartz surface. Our data support the hypothesis that the biological activity of quartz dust is not due to crystallinity but to crystal fragmentation, when conchoidal fractures are formed. Besides radical generation, fracturing upsets the expected long-range order of non-radical surface moieties - silanols, silanolates, siloxanes - which disrupt membranes and induce cellular toxicity, both outcomes associated to the inflammatory response to quartz.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Unknown 53 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 22%
Student > Master 5 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 7%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 8 15%
Environmental Science 7 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 6%
Other 13 24%
Unknown 14 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2019.
All research outputs
#4,090,313
of 14,613,233 outputs
Outputs from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#129
of 431 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,138
of 264,356 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,613,233 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 431 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,356 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them