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Effects of phenolic-rich extracts of Clinacanthus nutans on high fat and high cholesterol diet-induced insulin resistance

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, February 2016
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Mentioned by

peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
35 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of phenolic-rich extracts of Clinacanthus nutans on high fat and high cholesterol diet-induced insulin resistance
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12906-016-1049-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nadarajan Sarega, Mustapha Umar Imam, Norhaizan Md Esa, Norhasnida Zawawi, Maznah Ismail

Abstract

Clinacanthus nutans is used traditionally in many parts of Asia to improve well-being, but there are limited studies on its efficacy. We explored the potential use of C. nutans for prevention of high fat and high cholesterol diet-(HFHC-) induced insulin resistance in rats. The leaf of C. nutans was extracted using water (AL extract) and methanol (AML extract), and the extracts were fed to rats alongside the HFHC diet for 7 weeks, and compared with simvastatin. Oral glucose tolerance test, and serum insulin, retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), adiponectin and leptin were measured. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was computed, while transcriptional regulation of hepatic insulin signaling genes was also assessed. Glycemic response was higher in the HFHC group compared with the AL and AML groups, which also had lower serum RBP4, fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR. Serum adiponectin levels were higher, while leptin levels were lower in the AML and AL groups compared to the HFHC group. There was upregulation of the Insulin receptor substrate, phosphotidyl inositol-3-phosphate, adiponectin receptor and leptin recetor genes, in comparison with the HFHC group. Overall, the results showed that the HFHC diet worsened metabolic indices and induced insulin resistance partly through transcriptional regulation of the insulin signaling genes. C.nutans, on the other hand, attenuated the metabolic effects and transcriptional changes induced by the HFHC diet. The results suggested that C.nutans may be a good source of functional ingredient for the prevention of insulin resistance.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brunei Darussalam 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 34%
Student > Bachelor 7 20%
Student > Master 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 20%
Chemistry 4 11%
Chemical Engineering 3 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 9%
Other 7 20%
Unknown 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,805,799
of 7,406,294 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,048
of 1,822 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,337
of 262,934 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#40
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,406,294 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,822 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,934 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.