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Positive effects on bone mineralisation and muscular fitness after 10 months of intense school-based physical training for children aged 8–10 years: the FIT FIRST randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Sports Medicine, June 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

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33 news outlets
twitter
60 tweeters
facebook
11 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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90 Mendeley
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Title
Positive effects on bone mineralisation and muscular fitness after 10 months of intense school-based physical training for children aged 8–10 years: the FIT FIRST randomised controlled trial
Published in
British Journal of Sports Medicine, June 2016
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096219
Pubmed ID
Authors

Malte Nejst Larsen, Claus Malta Nielsen, Eva Wulff Helge, Mads Madsen, Vibeke Manniche, Lone Hansen, Peter Riis Hansen, Jens Bangsbo, Peter Krustrup

Abstract

We investigated whether musculoskeletal fitness of school children aged 8-10 years was affected by frequent intense PE sessions. 295 Danish school children aged 8-10 years were cluster randomised to a small-sided ball game group (SSG) (n=96, four schools, five classes), a circuit strength training group (CST) (n=83, four schools, four classes) or a control group (CON, n=116, two schools, five classes). SSG or CST was performed 3×40 min/week over 10 months. Whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans were used to determine areal bone mineral density (aBMD), bone mineral content (BMC) and lean body mass (LBM). Flamingo balance, standing long jump and 20-m sprint tests were used to determine muscular fitness. Analysis of baseline-to-10 months change scores showed between-group differences in favour of the interventions in whole-body aBMD (SSG vs CON: 8 mg/cm(2), 95% CI 3 to 13; CST vs CON: 7 mg/cm(2), 95% CI 2 to 13, p<0.05) and leg BMC (SSG vs CON: 11 g, 95% CI 4 to 18; CST vs CON: 11 g, 95% CI 3 to 18, p<0.05). SSG had higher change scores in leg aBMD compared with CON and CST (SSG vs CON: 19 mg/cm(2), 95% CI 11 to 39, p<0.05; SSG vs CST: 12 mg/cm(2), 95% CI 3 to 21, p<0.05), and CST had higher change scores in whole-body BMC compared with CON (CST vs CON: 25 g, 95% CI 10 to 39, p<0.05). Both training types resulted in higher change scores in postural balance (SSG vs CON: 2.4 fewer falls/min, 95% CI 0.3 to 4.5, CST vs CON: 3.6 fewer falls/min, 95% CI 1.3 to 5.9, p<0.05) and jump length (SSG vs CON: 10%, 95% CI 5 to 16%; CST vs CON: 9%, 95% CI 3 to 15%, p<0.05). No between-group differences were observed for sprint performance or LBM (p>0.05). In conclusion, 3×40 min/week with SSG or CST over a full school year improves bone mineralisation and several aspects of muscular fitness of children aged 8-10 years, suggesting that well-organised intense physical education classes can contribute positively to develop musculoskeletal health in young children. NCT02000492, post results.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 60 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 90 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 21%
Student > Master 19 21%
Unspecified 10 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Other 24 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 41 46%
Unspecified 15 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 9%
Neuroscience 4 4%
Other 10 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 290. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2019.
All research outputs
#38,438
of 12,980,854 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Sports Medicine
#170
of 4,953 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,752
of 264,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Sports Medicine
#9
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,980,854 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,953 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 46.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,030 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.