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Effects of Triple P parenting intervention on child health outcomes for childhood asthma and eczema: Randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Behaviour Research & Therapy, August 2016
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of Triple P parenting intervention on child health outcomes for childhood asthma and eczema: Randomised controlled trial
Published in
Behaviour Research & Therapy, August 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.brat.2016.06.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alina Morawska, Amy E. Mitchell, Scott Burgess, Jennifer Fraser

Abstract

Childhood chronic health conditions have considerable impact on children. We aimed to test the efficacy of a brief, group-based parenting intervention for improving illness-related child behaviour problems, parents' self-efficacy, quality of life, parents' competence with treatment, and symptom severity. A 2 (intervention vs. care as usual) by 3 (baseline, post-intervention, 6-month follow-up) design was used, with random group assignment. Participants were 107 parents of 2- to 10-year-old children with asthma and/or eczema. Parents completed self-report questionnaires, symptom diaries, and home observations were completed. The intervention comprised two 2-h group discussions based on Triple P. Parents in the intervention group reported (i) fewer eczema-related, but not asthma-related, child behaviour problems; (ii) improved self-efficacy for managing eczema, but not asthma; (iii) better quality of life for parent and family, but not child; (iv) no change in parental treatment competence; (v) reduced symptom severity, particularly for children prescribed corticosteroid-based treatments. Results demonstrate the potential for brief parenting interventions to improve childhood chronic illness management, child health outcomes, and family wellbeing. Effects were stronger for eczema-specific outcomes compared to asthma-specific outcomes. Effects on symptom severity are very promising, and further research examining effects on objective disease severity and treatment adherence is warranted. ACTRN12611000558921.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Librarian 5 10%
Other 15 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 15 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 14%
Social Sciences 7 14%
Unspecified 5 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Other 10 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2017.
All research outputs
#7,668,407
of 12,271,071 outputs
Outputs from Behaviour Research & Therapy
#1,369
of 1,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,016
of 275,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behaviour Research & Therapy
#13
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,271,071 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,663 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,529 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.