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Solutions To Emergency Department ‘Boarding’ And Crowding Are Underused And May Need To Be Legislated

Overview of attention for article published in Health Affairs, August 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
80 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
52 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
79 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
161 Mendeley
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Title
Solutions To Emergency Department ‘Boarding’ And Crowding Are Underused And May Need To Be Legislated
Published in
Health Affairs, August 2012
DOI 10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0786
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elaine Rabin, Keith Kocher, Mark McClelland, Jesse Pines, Ula Hwang, Niels Rathlev, Brent Asplin, N. Seth Trueger, Ellen Weber

Abstract

The practice of keeping admitted patients on stretchers in hospital emergency department hallways for hours or days, called "boarding," causes emergency department crowding and can be harmful to patients. Boarding increases patients' morbidity, lengths of hospital stay, and mortality. Strategies that optimize bed management reduce boarding by improving the efficiency of hospital patient flow, but these strategies are grossly underused. Convincing hospital leaders of the value of such solutions, and educating patients to advocate for such changes, may promote improvements. If these strategies do not work, legislation may be required to effect meaningful change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 52 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 161 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Unknown 157 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 38 24%
Lecturer 19 12%
Researcher 16 10%
Student > Bachelor 12 7%
Other 11 7%
Other 37 23%
Unknown 28 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 45 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 40 25%
Social Sciences 10 6%
Engineering 9 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 4%
Other 12 7%
Unknown 38 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 683. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2020.
All research outputs
#13,133
of 15,883,046 outputs
Outputs from Health Affairs
#51
of 5,522 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47
of 129,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Affairs
#1
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,883,046 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,522 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 55.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 129,677 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.