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Why do Varroa mites prefer nurse bees?

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
Title
Why do Varroa mites prefer nurse bees?
Published in
Scientific Reports, June 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep28228
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xianbing Xie, Zachary Y. Huang, Zhijiang Zeng, Xie, Xianbing, Huang, Zachary Y, Zeng, Zhijiang

Abstract

The Varroa mite, Varroa destructor, is an acarine ecto-parasite on Apis mellifera. It is the worst pest of Apis mellifera, yet its reproductive biology on the host is not well understood. In particular, the significance of the phoretic stage, when mites feed on adult bees for a few days, is not clear. In addition, it is not clear whether the preference of mites for nurses observed in the laboratory also happens inside real colonies. We show that Varroa mites prefer nurses over both newly emerged bees and forgers in a colony setting. We then determined the mechanism behind this preference. We show that this preference maximizes Varroa fitness, although due to the fact that each mite must find a second host (a pupa) to reproduce, the fitness benefit to the mites is not immediate but delayed. Our results suggest that the Varroa mite is a highly adapted parasite for honey bees.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 5%
New Zealand 1 5%
Unknown 18 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 35%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 30%
Student > Master 4 20%
Other 1 5%
Student > Postgraduate 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 95%
Unspecified 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 64. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2016.
All research outputs
#123,544
of 7,722,526 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#1,585
of 30,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,078
of 266,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#163
of 3,197 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,722,526 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 30,497 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,600 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,197 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.