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Aortic augmentation index in endurance athletes: a role for cardiorespiratory fitness

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, June 2016
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Aortic augmentation index in endurance athletes: a role for cardiorespiratory fitness
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, June 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00421-016-3407-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joshua Denham, Nicholas J. Brown, Maciej Tomaszewski, Bryan Williams, Brendan J. O’Brien, Fadi J. Charchar

Abstract

Endurance exercise improves cardiovascular health and reduces mortality risk. Augmentation index (AIx) reflects adverse loading exerted on the heart and large arteries and predicts future cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to establish whether endurance athletes possess lower AIx and aortic blood pressure compared to healthy controls, and to determine the association between AIx and cardiorespiratory fitness. Forty-six endurance athletes and 43 healthy controls underwent central BP and AIx measurements by non-invasive applanation tonometry before a maximal exercise test. Peak oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) was assessed by pulmonary analysis. Relative to controls, athletes had significantly lower brachial diastolic blood pressure (BP, -4.8 mmHg, p < 0.01), central systolic BP (-3.5 mmHg, p = 0.07), and AIx at a heart rate of 75 beats min(-1) (AIx@75, -11.9 %, p < 0.001). No AIx@75 differences were observed between athletes and controls when adjusted for age and [Formula: see text] [athletes vs controls mean (%) ± SE: -6.9 ± 2.2 vs -5.7 ± 2.3, p = 0.76]. Relative to men with low [Formula: see text], those with moderate and high [Formula: see text] had lower age-adjusted AIx@75 (p < 0.001). In women, those with high [Formula: see text] had lower AIx@75 than those with low and moderate [Formula: see text] (p < 0.01). The lower AIx@75 in endurance athletes is partly mediated by [Formula: see text]. While an inverse relationship between AIx@75 and [Formula: see text] was found in men, women with the highest [Formula: see text] possessed lowest AIx@75 compared to females with moderate or poor cardiorespiratory fitness. We recommend aerobic training aimed at achieving a minimum [Formula: see text] of 45 ml kg(-1) min(-1) to decrease the risk of future cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 34 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 27%
Researcher 6 16%
Unspecified 5 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Lecturer 3 8%
Other 10 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 27%
Unspecified 9 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Sports and Recreations 4 11%
Psychology 3 8%
Other 7 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2019.
All research outputs
#3,439,849
of 13,411,675 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#1,068
of 2,973 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,883
of 223,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#12
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,411,675 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,973 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,897 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.