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The Missing Link of Jewish European Ancestry: Contrasting the Rhineland and the Khazarian Hypotheses.

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology & Evolution, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 1,561)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
419 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
66 Facebook pages
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
45 Google+ users
reddit
6 Redditors
video
4 video uploaders

Readers on

mendeley
60 Mendeley
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Title
The Missing Link of Jewish European Ancestry: Contrasting the Rhineland and the Khazarian Hypotheses.
Published in
Genome Biology & Evolution, January 2012
DOI 10.1093/gbe/evs119
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eran Elhaik, Elhaik E, Elhaik, Eran, E. Elhaik

Abstract

The question of Jewish ancestry has been the subject of controversy for over two centuries and has yet to be resolved. The "Rhineland hypothesis" depicts Eastern European Jews as a "population isolate" that emerged from a small group of German Jews who migrated eastward and expanded rapidly. Alternatively, the "Khazarian hypothesis" suggests that Eastern European Jews descended from the Khazars, an amalgam of Turkic clans that settled the Caucasus in the early centuries CE and converted to Judaism in the 8th century. Mesopotamian and Greco-Roman Jews continuously reinforced the Judaized empire until the 13th century. Following the collapse of their empire, the Judeo-Khazars fled to Eastern Europe. The rise of European Jewry is therefore explained by the contribution of the Judeo-Khazars. Thus far, however, the Khazars' contribution has been estimated only empirically, as the absence of genome-wide data from Caucasus populations precluded testing the Khazarian hypothesis. Recent sequencing of modern Caucasus populations prompted us to revisit the Khazarian hypothesis and compare it with the Rhineland hypothesis. We applied a wide range of population genetic analyses to compare these two hypotheses. Our findings support the Khazarian hypothesis and portray the European Jewish genome as a mosaic of Near Eastern-Caucasus, European, and Semitic ancestries, thereby consolidating previous contradictory reports of Jewish ancestry. We further describe a major difference among Caucasus populations explained by the early presence of Judeans in the Southern and Central Caucasus. Our results have important implications for the demographic forces that shaped the genetic diversity in the Caucasus and for medical studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 419 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 5%
France 2 3%
United States 2 3%
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 52 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Other 5 8%
Professor 4 7%
Other 13 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 15%
Arts and Humanities 7 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 8%
Chemistry 4 7%
Other 10 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 488. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,480
of 9,724,484 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology & Evolution
#2
of 1,561 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72
of 104,277 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology & Evolution
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,724,484 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,561 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 104,277 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them