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Occupational skin cancer: Systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira, June 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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83 Mendeley
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Title
Occupational skin cancer: Systematic review
Published in
Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira, June 2016
DOI 10.1590/1806-9282.62.03.280
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jéssica Suellen Sena, Régio José Santiago Girão, Sionara Melo Figueiredo de Carvalho, Rosielly Melo Tavares, Fernando Luiz Affonso Fonseca, Patrícia Barros Aquino Silva, Maria Clara Fortes Portela Barbosa

Abstract

To analyze the epidemiological profile, risk factors in the workplace environment and prevention methods for professionals at risk of skin cancer. A systematic review of articles on occupational skin cancer, published in the Lilacs, Scielo, Medline and Cochrane Library from January 1st, 2008, to December 31st, 2013, was performed. The search included the following terms: "neoplasias cutâneas" (DeCS), "exposição ocupacional" (DeCS), "epidemiologia" (DeCS) as well as the keyword "prevenção", and their equivalents in English. After analyzing the titles and summaries of articles, the search strategy resulted in 83 references, of which 22 articles met the eligibility criteria. We found that sun exposure is the main occupational risk factor for skin cancer, causing outdoor workers to be the most vulnerable to developing occupational skin cancer. Professionals with low levels of education and European descent are at increased risk of developing this cancer. Outdoor workers are more vulnerable to developing occupational skin cancer, estimating that professionals with low level of education and European descent are at increased risk of developing this cancer. Therefore, companies need to invest more in the health of workers by providing protective equipment and thus preventing occupational skin cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Unknown 81 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 23%
Student > Master 9 11%
Researcher 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 18 22%
Unknown 18 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 12%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Unspecified 2 2%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 22 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 January 2017.
All research outputs
#13,047,873
of 20,957,071 outputs
Outputs from Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira
#244
of 863 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,167
of 278,905 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira
#6
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,957,071 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 863 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,905 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.