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Longitudinal Assessment of Self-Reported Recent Back Pain and Combat Deployment in the Millennium Cohort Study

Overview of attention for article published in Spine, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

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3 Mendeley
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Title
Longitudinal Assessment of Self-Reported Recent Back Pain and Combat Deployment in the Millennium Cohort Study
Published in
Spine, June 2016
DOI 10.1097/brs.0000000000001739
Pubmed ID
Authors

Granado, Nisara S, Pietrucha, Amanda, Ryan, Margaret, Boyko, Edward J, Hooper, Tomoko I, Smith, Besa, Smith, Tyler C, Granado, Nisara S., Boyko, Edward J., Hooper, Tomoko I., Smith, Tyler C., Nisara S. Granado, Amanda Pietrucha, Margaret Ryan, Edward J. Boyko, Tomoko I. Hooper, Besa Smith, Tyler C. Smith

Abstract

Prospective Cohort Study. Activities performed during military operations vary in complexity and physical demand. The risk for mental illness following military combat deployment has been well documented. However, information regarding the possible contribution of back pain to decreased mental and functional health is scarce. To our knowledge, this is the first study to prospectively assess deployment and self-reported recent back pain in a population-based U.S. military cohort. The study consisted of Millennium Cohort participants who were followed for the development of back pain for an average of 3.9 years. Descriptive statistics and longitudinal analyses were used to assess the temporal relationship of deployment with self-reported recent back pain at follow-up (N = 53,933). Recent back pain was self-reported by 8,379 (15.5%) participants at follow-up. After adjusting for covariates, deployers with combat experiences had higher odds (odds ratio [OR] = 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28, 1.50) of recent back pain than noncombat deployers. There was no association between recent back pain and nondeployers compared with noncombat deployers. Service support/supply handlers were at increased odds of reporting recent back pain (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.21) than functional support/administration occupations. Occupations associated with a physically demanding work environment had higher risk of back pain. Deployers with combat experiences were more likely to report back pain postdeployment. This well-defined group of military personnel may potentially benefit from integrated prevention efforts. 3.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 33%
Denmark 1 33%
Unknown 1 33%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 1 33%
Librarian 1 33%
Unspecified 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 67%
Social Sciences 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,800,246
of 8,425,604 outputs
Outputs from Spine
#1,259
of 5,054 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,295
of 267,236 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Spine
#47
of 145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,425,604 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,054 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,236 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.