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Effects of Chronic Jet Lag on Tumor Progression in Mice

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, November 2004
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters
patent
1 patent

Citations

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324 Dimensions

Readers on

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205 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of Chronic Jet Lag on Tumor Progression in Mice
Published in
Cancer Research, November 2004
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-04-0674
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisabeth Filipski, Franck Delaunay, Verdun M. King, Ming-Wei Wu, Bruno Claustrat, Aline Gréchez-Cassiau, Catherine Guettier, Michael H. Hastings, Lévi Francis

Abstract

Frequent transmeridian flights or predominant work at night can increase cancer risk. Altered circadian rhythms also predict for poor survival in cancer patients, whereas physical destruction of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the hypothalamic circadian pacemaker, accelerates tumor growth in mice. Here we tested the effect of functional disruption of circadian system on tumor progression in a novel experimental model of chronic jet lag. B6D2F(1) mice were synchronized with 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness or underwent repeat 8-hour advances of the light/dark cycle every 2 days before inoculation of Glasgow osteosarcoma. The 24-hour changes were assessed for plasma corticosterone, clock protein mPER1 expression in the SCN, and mRNA expression of clock genes mPer2 and mRev-erbalpha in liver and tumor. Time series were analyzed by spectral analysis and/or Cosinor. Differences were compared with analysis of variance (ANOVA). The 24-hour rest/activity cycle was ablated, and the rhythms of body temperature, serum corticosterone, and mPER1 protein expression in the SCN were markedly altered in jet-lagged mice as compared with controls (ANOVA, P < 0.001 for corticosterone and P = 0.01 for mPER1). Tumor grew faster in the jet-lagged animals as compared with controls (ANOVA, P < 0.001), whereas exposure to constant light or darkness had no effect (ANOVA, P = 0.66 and P = 0.8, respectively). The expression of mPer2 and mRev-erbalpha mRNAs in controls showed significant circadian rhythms in the liver (P = 0.006 and P = 0.003, respectively, Cosinor) and in the tumor (P = 0.04 and P < 0.001). Both rhythms were suppressed in the liver (P = 0.2 and P = 0.1, respectively, Cosinor) and in the tumor (P = 0.5) of jet-lagged mice. Altered environmental conditions can disrupt circadian clock molecular coordination in peripheral organs including tumors and play a significant role in malignant progression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 205 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Italy 3 1%
Germany 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 191 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 18%
Researcher 34 17%
Student > Bachelor 23 11%
Student > Master 18 9%
Professor 15 7%
Other 48 23%
Unknown 30 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 61 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 34 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 30 15%
Neuroscience 14 7%
Engineering 4 2%
Other 20 10%
Unknown 42 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 90. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2022.
All research outputs
#394,385
of 22,805,349 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#217
of 17,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#400
of 62,397 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#3
of 206 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,805,349 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 17,868 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 62,397 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 206 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.