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Clinical confidence following an interprofessional educational program on eating disorders for health care professionals: a qualitative analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, August 2012
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
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Title
Clinical confidence following an interprofessional educational program on eating disorders for health care professionals: a qualitative analysis
Published in
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, August 2012
DOI 10.2147/jmdh.s33089
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gunn Pettersen, Rosenvinge, Thune-Larsen, Wynn

Abstract

There are an increasing number of educational programs to improve clinical competence and skills to treat mental disorders. For complex disorders there is also a focus on improving the quality of interprofessional work. This paper reports on interprofessional outputs of an educational program on eating disorders. A total of 207 professionals who completed the program were requested to describe up to 12 possible scenarios depicted as realistic prospects for their future work within this field. Analyzing the scenarios resulted in three categories of describing the participants' preferences: (1) interprofessional interventions and treatment; (2) the further development of competence; and (3) organization of the health care system. The findings showed that the participants were considering working across new lines in their current workplaces or crossing borders to new frontiers in the execution of competence. Our findings may be summarized into the concept of "clinical confidence." This concept has so far been understood as some kind of personal trait, disposition, or attitude. The present findings add nuances to this concept in terms of state-dependent encouragement, engagement, and a potential to act and to cross professional borders in order to better treat complex mental disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 20%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 4 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Social Sciences 3 20%
Psychology 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2012.
All research outputs
#11,666,163
of 18,481,729 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#329
of 558 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,228
of 138,919 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#12
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,481,729 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 558 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 138,919 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.