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High Rates of Detection of Clade 2.3.4.4 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5 Viruses in Wild Birds in the Pacific Northwest During the Winter of 2014–15

Overview of attention for article published in Avian Diseases, May 2016
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Title
High Rates of Detection of Clade 2.3.4.4 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5 Viruses in Wild Birds in the Pacific Northwest During the Winter of 2014–15
Published in
Avian Diseases, May 2016
DOI 10.1637/11137-050815-reg
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ip, Hon S, Dusek, Robert J, Bodenstein, Barbara, Torchetti, Mia Kim, DeBruyn, Paul, Mansfield, Kristin G, DeLiberto, Thomas, Sleeman, Jonathan M, Hon S. Ip, Robert J. Dusek, Barbara Bodenstein, Mia Kim Torchetti, Paul DeBruyn, Kristin G. Mansfield, Thomas DeLiberto, Jonathan M. Sleeman

Abstract

In 2014, clade 2.3.4.4 H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses spread across the Republic of Korea and ultimately were reported in China, Japan, Russia, and Europe. Mortality associated with a reassortant HPAI H5N2 virus was detected in poultry farms in western Canada at the end of November. The same strain (with identical genetic structure) was then detected in free-living wild birds that had died prior to December 8, 2014, of unrelated causes in Whatcom County, Washington, U. S. A., in an area contiguous with the index Canadian location. A gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) that had hunted and fed on an American wigeon (Anas americana) on December 6, 2014, in the same area, and died 2 days later, tested positive for the Eurasian-origin HPAI H5N8. Subsequently, an active surveillance program using hunter-harvested waterfowl in Washington and Oregon detected 10 HPAI H5 viruses, of three different subtypes (four H5N2, three H5N8, and three H5N1) with four segments in common (HA, PB2, NP, and MA). In addition, a mortality-based passive surveillance program detected 18 HPAI (14 H5N2 and four H5N8) cases from Idaho, Kansas, Oregon, Minnesota, Montana, Washington, and Wisconsin. Comparatively, mortality-based passive surveillance appears to have detected these HPAI infections at a higher rate than active surveillance during the period following initial introduction into the United States.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 6%
Denmark 1 6%
Unknown 16 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 28%
Other 2 11%
Professor 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Unknown 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 44%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%
Unknown 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2016.
All research outputs
#13,329,378
of 15,098,051 outputs
Outputs from Avian Diseases
#262
of 347 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#218,655
of 264,953 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Avian Diseases
#3
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,098,051 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 347 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,953 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.