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Upregulation of the cannabinoid CB2 receptor in environmental and viral inflammation-driven rat models of Parkinson's disease

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Neurology, September 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Upregulation of the cannabinoid CB2 receptor in environmental and viral inflammation-driven rat models of Parkinson's disease
Published in
Experimental Neurology, September 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.expneurol.2016.06.014
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ruth M. Concannon, Bright N. Okine, David P. Finn, Eilís Dowd

Abstract

In recent years, it has become evident that Parkinson's disease is associated with a self-sustaining cycle of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, with dying neurons activating microglia, which, once activated, can release several factors that kill further neurons. One emerging pharmacological target that has the potential to break this cycle is the microglial CB2 receptor which, when activated, can suppress microglial activity and reduce their neurotoxicity. However, very little is known about CB2 receptor expression in animal models of Parkinson's disease which is essential for valid preclinical assessment of the anti-Parkinsonian efficacy of drugs targeting the CB2 receptor. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate and compare the changes that occur in CB2 receptor expression in environmental and inflammation-driven models of Parkinson's disease. To do so, male Sprague Dawley rats were given unilateral, intra-striatal injections of the Parkinson's disease-associated agricultural pesticide, rotenone, or the viral-like inflammagen, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly (I:C)). Animals underwent behavioural testing for motor dysfunction on Days 7, 14 and 28 post-surgery, and were sacrificed on Days 1, 4, 14 and 28. Changes in the endocannabinoid system and neuroinflamamtion were investigated by qRT-PCR, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and immunohistochemistry. After injection of rotenone or Poly (I:C) into the rat striatum, we found that expression of the CB2 receptor was significantly elevated in both models, and that this increase correlated significantly with an increase in microglial activation in the rotenone model. Interestingly, the increase in CB2 receptor expression in the inflammation-driven Poly (I:C) model was significantly more pronounced than that in the neurotoxic rotenone model. Thus, this study has shown that CB2 receptor expression is dysregulated in animal models of Parkinson's disease, and has also revealed significant differences in the level of dysregulation between the models themselves. This study indicates that these models may be useful for further investigation of the CB2 receptor as a target for anti-inflammatory disease modification in Parkinson's disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 2%
Unknown 41 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Student > Master 8 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Unspecified 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 12 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 21%
Neuroscience 8 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 7%
Other 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,314,863
of 12,204,749 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Neurology
#136
of 2,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,071
of 271,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Neurology
#7
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,204,749 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,663 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.