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Supplementation‐induced increase in circulating omega‐3 serum levels is not associated with a reduction in depressive symptoms: Results from the MooDFOOD depression prevention trial

Overview of attention for article published in Depression & Anxiety (1091-4269), August 2020
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
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Title
Supplementation‐induced increase in circulating omega‐3 serum levels is not associated with a reduction in depressive symptoms: Results from the MooDFOOD depression prevention trial
Published in
Depression & Anxiety (1091-4269), August 2020
DOI 10.1002/da.23092
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carisha S. Thesing, Yuri Milaneschi, Mariska Bot, Ingeborg A. Brouwer, Matt Owens, Ulrich Hegerl, Margalida Gili, Miquel Roca, Elisabeth Kohls, Ed Watkins, Marjolein Visser, Brenda W. J. H. Penninx

Abstract

There is ambiguity on how omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are associated with depression, and what the temporality of the association might be. The present study aimed to examine whether (intervention-induced changes in) n-3 PUFA levels were associated with (changes in) depressive symptoms. Baseline, 6- and 12-month follow-up data on 682 overweight and subclinically depressed persons from four European countries that participated in the MooDFOOD depression prevention randomized controlled trial were used. Participants were allocated to four intervention groups: (a) placebos, (b) placebos and food-related behavioral activation therapy (F-BA), (c) multinutrient supplements (fish oil and multivitamin), and (d) multinutrient supplements and F-BA. Depressive symptoms were measured using the inventory of depressive symptomatology. PUFA levels (µmol/L) were measured using gas chromatography. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographics, lifestyle, and somatic health. Increases in n-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid levels over time were significantly larger in the supplement groups than in placebo groups. Change in PUFA levels was not significantly associated with the change in depressive symptoms (β = .002, SE = 0.003, p = .39; β = .003, SE = 0.005, p = .64; β = .005, SE = 0.005, p = .29; β = -.0002, SE = 0.0004, p = .69). Baseline PUFA levels did not modify the intervention effects on depressive symptoms. In overweight and subclinical depressed persons, multinutrient supplements led to significant increases in n-3 PUFA levels over time, which were not associated with changes in depressive symptoms. Multinutrient supplements do not seem to be an effective preventive strategy in lowering depressive symptoms over time in these at-risk groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 24%
Researcher 7 21%
Student > Master 5 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Librarian 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 18%
Psychology 4 12%
Computer Science 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 10 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 January 2021.
All research outputs
#2,048,253
of 18,447,634 outputs
Outputs from Depression & Anxiety (1091-4269)
#357
of 1,599 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,940
of 307,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Depression & Anxiety (1091-4269)
#9
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,447,634 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,599 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 307,790 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.