↓ Skip to main content

The modelling cycle for collective animal behaviour

Overview of attention for article published in Interface Focus, August 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
52 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
170 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The modelling cycle for collective animal behaviour
Published in
Interface Focus, August 2012
DOI 10.1098/rsfs.2012.0031
Pubmed ID
Authors

David J. T. Sumpter, Richard P. Mann, Andrea Perna

Abstract

Collective animal behaviour is the study of how interactions between individuals produce group level patterns, and why these interactions have evolved. This study has proved itself uniquely interdisciplinary, involving physicists, mathematicians, engineers as well as biologists. Almost all experimental work in this area is related directly or indirectly to mathematical models, with regular movement back and forth between models, experimental data and statistical fitting. In this paper, we describe how the modelling cycle works in the study of collective animal behaviour. We classify studies as addressing questions at different levels or linking different levels, i.e. as local, local to global, global to local or global. We also describe three distinct approaches-theory-driven, data-driven and model selection-to these questions. We show, with reference to our own research on species across different taxa, how we move between these different levels of description and how these various approaches can be applied to link levels together.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 170 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 4%
Switzerland 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 156 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 25%
Researcher 25 15%
Student > Master 24 14%
Student > Bachelor 20 12%
Professor 9 5%
Other 31 18%
Unknown 18 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 64 38%
Computer Science 15 9%
Physics and Astronomy 12 7%
Mathematics 11 6%
Engineering 9 5%
Other 33 19%
Unknown 26 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2021.
All research outputs
#5,366,141
of 17,351,915 outputs
Outputs from Interface Focus
#215
of 483 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,666
of 106,262 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Interface Focus
#5
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,351,915 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 483 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 106,262 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.