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Public consultation changes guidance on the use of health-care interventions. An observational study

Overview of attention for article published in Health Expectations, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
Title
Public consultation changes guidance on the use of health-care interventions. An observational study
Published in
Health Expectations, June 2016
DOI 10.1111/hex.12476
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bruce Campbell, Jeffrey Tabiri-Essuman, Helen Gallo, Vassilia Verdiel, Lakshmi Mandava, Mohamed Ansaf Azhar, John Powell

Abstract

To investigate the responses to public consultation on draft guidance on interventional procedures (IP) for the UK National Health Services, and the changes made as a result of consultation. Retrospective review of responses received during public consultation for 183 pieces of draft guidance, and subsequent changes made. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in the UK. Guidance produced December 2009-December 2014. Numbers (%) of public consultations receiving responses, and resulting changes made to draft guidance. Responses were received during 159 (86.9%) periods of public consultation, from a total of 853 people or organizations (median number per consultation 3; range 0-82; interquartile range 1-5). Changes were made to draft guidance following 136 (74.3%) consultations. These changes were to the category (2.7%) or wording (8.7%) of the main recommendation; to other recommendations (about consent, patient selection, training and future research) (31.1%); and to other sections of guidance (description of the procedure and of the evidence on its efficacy and safety) (70.5%). Additional published evidence was proffered for 22.4%. Health-care professionals or their specialist societies were the most frequent responders to consultation (68.8%), patients or patient organizations accounted for 22.4% and medical device companies accounted for 8.8%. This study shows substantial engagement with public consultation and frequent changes made to draft guidance as a result. These findings are likely to be relevant to other areas of health-care and national policymaking that seek to be responsive to their stakeholders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 43%
Lecturer 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 2 29%
Mathematics 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%
Environmental Science 1 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 14%
Other 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2017.
All research outputs
#6,542,337
of 12,353,024 outputs
Outputs from Health Expectations
#489
of 785 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,423
of 271,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Expectations
#28
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,024 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 785 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,246 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.