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Host Inflammatory Response to Mosquito Bites Enhances the Severity of Arbovirus Infection

Overview of attention for article published in Immunity, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 3,720)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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78 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
229 Mendeley
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3 CiteULike
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Title
Host Inflammatory Response to Mosquito Bites Enhances the Severity of Arbovirus Infection
Published in
Immunity, June 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.immuni.2016.06.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marieke Pingen, Steven R. Bryden, Emilie Pondeville, Esther Schnettler, Alain Kohl, Andres Merits, John K. Fazakerley, Gerard J. Graham, Clive S. McKimmie

Abstract

Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are responsible for transmitting many medically important viruses such as those that cause Zika and dengue. The inoculation of viruses into mosquito bite sites is an important and common stage of all mosquito-borne virus infections. We show, using Semliki Forest virus and Bunyamwera virus, that these viruses use this inflammatory niche to aid their replication and dissemination in vivo. Mosquito bites were characterized by an edema that retained virus at the inoculation site and an inflammatory influx of neutrophils that coordinated a localized innate immune program that inadvertently facilitated virus infection by encouraging the entry and infection of virus-permissive myeloid cells. Neutrophil depletion and therapeutic blockade of inflammasome activity suppressed inflammation and abrogated the ability of the bite to promote infection. This study identifies facets of mosquito bite inflammation that are important determinants of the subsequent systemic course and clinical outcome of virus infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 57 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 229 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
United Kingdom 3 1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Guatemala 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Unknown 216 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 52 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 21%
Student > Master 30 13%
Student > Bachelor 25 11%
Other 13 6%
Other 38 17%
Unknown 23 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 71 31%
Immunology and Microbiology 44 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 32 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 3%
Other 22 10%
Unknown 33 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 990. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2017.
All research outputs
#4,664
of 14,354,509 outputs
Outputs from Immunity
#2
of 3,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178
of 263,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Immunity
#1
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,354,509 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,720 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,273 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.