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The endocannabinoid system in the baboon (Papio spp.) as a complex framework for developmental pharmacology

Overview of attention for article published in Neurotoxicology & Teratology, November 2016
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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Title
The endocannabinoid system in the baboon (Papio spp.) as a complex framework for developmental pharmacology
Published in
Neurotoxicology & Teratology, November 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.ntt.2016.06.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Iram P. Rodriguez-Sanchez, Josee Guindon, Marco Ruiz, M. Elizabeth Tejero, Gene Hubbard, Laura E. Martinez-de-Villarreal, Hugo A. Barrera-Saldaña, Edward J. Dick, Anthony G. Comuzzie, Natalia E. Schlabritz-Loutsevitch

Abstract

The consumption of marijuana (exogenous cannabinoid) almost doubled in adults during last decade. Consumption of exogenous cannabinoids interferes with the endogenous cannabinoid (or "endocannabinoid" (eCB)) system (ECS), which comprises N-arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA), 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), endocannabinoid receptors (cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1R and CB2R), encoded by CNR1 and CNR2, respectively), and synthesizing/degrading enzymes (FAAH, fatty-acid amide hydrolase; MAGL, monoacylglycerol lipase; DAGL-α, diacylglycerol lipase-alpha). Reports regarding the toxic and therapeutic effects of pharmacological compounds targeting the ECS are sometimes contradictory. This may be caused by the fact that structure of the eCBs varies in the species studied. First: to clone and characterize the cDNAs of selected members of ECS in a non-human primate (baboon, Papio spp.), and second: to compare those cDNA sequences to known human structural variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes). Polymerase chain reaction-amplified gene products from baboon tissues were transformed into Escherichia coli. Amplicon-positive clones were sequenced, and the obtained sequences were conceptually translated into amino-acid sequences using the genetic code. Among the ECS members, CNR1 was the best conserved gene between humans and baboons. The phenotypes associated with mutations in the untranslated regions of this gene in humans have not been described in baboons. One difference in the structure of CNR2 between humans and baboons was detected in the region with the only known clinically relevant polymorphism in a human receptor. All of the differences in the amino-acid structure of DAGL-α between humans and baboons were located in the hydroxylase domain, close to phosphorylation sites. None of the differences in the amino-acid structure of MAGL observed between baboons and humans were located in the area critical for enzyme function. The evaluation of the data, obtained in non-human primate model of cannabis-related developmental exposure should take into consideration possible evolutionary-determined species-specific differences in the CB1R expression, CB2R transduction pathway, and FAAH and DAGLα substrate-enzyme interactions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 33%
Researcher 3 17%
Student > Master 3 17%
Unspecified 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 17%
Neuroscience 3 17%
Unspecified 2 11%
Psychology 2 11%
Other 3 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2017.
All research outputs
#3,395,575
of 12,343,843 outputs
Outputs from Neurotoxicology & Teratology
#252
of 792 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,158
of 271,289 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neurotoxicology & Teratology
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,343,843 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 792 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,289 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.