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Estimating species - area relationships by modeling abundance and frequency subject to incomplete sampling

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, June 2016
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Title
Estimating species - area relationships by modeling abundance and frequency subject to incomplete sampling
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, June 2016
DOI 10.1002/ece3.2244
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yamaura, Yuichi, Connor, Edward F., Royle, J. Andrew, Itoh, Katsuo, Sato, Kiyoshi, Taki, Hisatomo, Mishima, Yoshio, Connor, Edward F, Royle, J Andrew

Abstract

Models and data used to describe species-area relationships confound sampling with ecological process as they fail to acknowledge that estimates of species richness arise due to sampling. This compromises our ability to make ecological inferences from and about species-area relationships. We develop and illustrate hierarchical community models of abundance and frequency to estimate species richness. The models we propose separate sampling from ecological processes by explicitly accounting for the fact that sampled patches are seldom completely covered by sampling plots and that individuals present in the sampling plots are imperfectly detected. We propose a multispecies abundance model in which community assembly is treated as the summation of an ensemble of species-level Poisson processes and estimate patch-level species richness as a derived parameter. We use sampling process models appropriate for specific survey methods. We propose a multispecies frequency model that treats the number of plots in which a species occurs as a binomial process. We illustrate these models using data collected in surveys of early-successional bird species and plants in young forest plantation patches. Results indicate that only mature forest plant species deviated from the constant density hypothesis, but the null model suggested that the deviations were too small to alter the form of species-area relationships. Nevertheless, results from simulations clearly show that the aggregate pattern of individual species density-area relationships and occurrence probability-area relationships can alter the form of species-area relationships. The plant community model estimated that only half of the species present in the regional species pool were encountered during the survey. The modeling framework we propose explicitly accounts for sampling processes so that ecological processes can be examined free of sampling artefacts. Our modeling approach is extensible and could be applied to a variety of study designs and allows the inclusion of additional environmental covariates.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
Georgia 1 2%
China 1 2%
Unknown 38 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 24%
Student > Master 8 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 17%
Other 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 56%
Environmental Science 10 24%
Unspecified 3 7%
Engineering 2 5%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,014,190
of 7,931,561 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#1,693
of 2,001 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#183,640
of 262,170 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#114
of 145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,931,561 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.