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Evidence from Y-chromosome analysis for a late exclusively eastern expansion of the Bantu-speaking people

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Human Genetics, August 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
Evidence from Y-chromosome analysis for a late exclusively eastern expansion of the Bantu-speaking people
Published in
European Journal of Human Genetics, August 2012
DOI 10.1038/ejhg.2012.176
Pubmed ID
Authors

Naser Ansari Pour, Christopher A Plaster, Neil Bradman

Abstract

The expansion of the Bantu-speaking people (EBSP) during the past 3000-5000 years is an event of great importance in the history of humanity. Anthropology, archaeology, linguistics and, in recent decades, genetics have been used to elucidate some of the events and processes involved. Although it is generally accepted that the EBSP has its origin in the so-called Bantu Homeland situated in the area of the border between Nigeria and the Grassfields of Cameroon, and that it followed both western and eastern routes, much less is known about the number and dates of those expansions, if more than one. Mitochondrial, Y-chromosome and autosomal DNA analyses have been carried out in attempts to understand the demographic events that have taken place. There is an increasing evidence that the expansion was a more complex process than originally thought and that neither a single demographic event nor an early split between western and eastern groups occurred. In this study, we analysed unique event polymorphism and short tandem repeat variation in non-recombining Y-chromosome haplogroups contained within the E1b1a haplogroup, which is exclusive to individuals of recent African ancestry, in a large, geographically widely distributed, set of sub-Saharan Africans (groups=43, n=2757), all of whom, except one Nilo-Saharan-speaking group, spoke a Niger-Congo language and most a Bantu tongue. Analysis of diversity and rough estimates of times to the most recent common ancestors of haplogroups provide evidence of multiple expansions along eastern and western routes and a late, exclusively eastern route, expansion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 3%
France 1 3%
Australia 1 3%
Unknown 34 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 30%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 8 22%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 51%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 24%
Arts and Humanities 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2018.
All research outputs
#1,386,108
of 13,735,692 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Human Genetics
#401
of 2,570 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,561
of 126,981 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Human Genetics
#6
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,735,692 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,570 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 126,981 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.