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Speed of Heart Rate Recovery in Response to Orthostatic Challenge

Overview of attention for article published in Circulation Research, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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36 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
Speed of Heart Rate Recovery in Response to Orthostatic Challenge
Published in
Circulation Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1161/circresaha.116.308577
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cathal McCrory, Lisa F. Berkman, Hugh Nolan, Neil O’Leary, Margaret Foley, Rose Anne Kenny

Abstract

Speed of Heart Rate Recovery (HRR) may serve as an important biomarker of aging and mortality. To examine whether the speed of HRR following an orthostatic maneuver (i.e. active stand from supine position) predicts mortality. A longitudinal cohort study involving a nationally representative sample of community dwelling older persons aged 50 years+. 4475 participants completed an active stand at baseline as part of a detailed clinic-based cardiovascular assessment. Beat-to-beat heart rate and blood pressure responses to standing were measured over a two-minute window using a finometer and binned in 10-second intervals. We modeled HRR to the stand by age group, cardiovascular disease burden, and mortality status using a random effects model. Mortality status over a mean follow-up duration of 4 years served as the primary end-point (n=138). Speed of HRR in the immediate 20 seconds after standing was a strong predictor of mortality. A one beat per minute slower between 10 and 20 seconds after standing increased the hazard of mortality by 6% controlling for established risk factors. A clear dose-response relationship was evident. 69 participants in the slowest HRR quartile died over the observation period compared with 14 participants in the fastest HRR quartile. Participants in the slowest recovery quartile were 2.3 times more likely to die compared with those in the fastest recovery quartile. Speed of orthostatic HRR predicts mortality and may aid clinical decision making. Attenuated orthostatic HRR may reflect dysregulation of the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 52 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 19%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Student > Master 5 9%
Other 12 22%
Unknown 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 22%
Engineering 5 9%
Neuroscience 5 9%
Sports and Recreations 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Other 13 24%
Unknown 12 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2020.
All research outputs
#700,680
of 15,794,319 outputs
Outputs from Circulation Research
#179
of 6,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,383
of 265,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Circulation Research
#6
of 110 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,794,319 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,393 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,372 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 110 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.