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Characterising the material properties at the interface between skin and a skin vaccination microprojection device

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Biomaterialia, March 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Characterising the material properties at the interface between skin and a skin vaccination microprojection device
Published in
Acta Biomaterialia, March 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.actbio.2016.02.039
Pubmed ID
Authors

Crichton, Michael L, Archer-Jones, Cameron, Meliga, Stefano, Edwards, Grant, Martin, Darren, Huang, Han, Kendall, Mark A F

Abstract

The rapid emergence of micro-devices for biomedical applications over the past two decades has introduced new challenges for the materials used in the devices. Devices like microneedles and the Nanopatch, require sufficient strength to puncture skin often with sharp-slender micro-scale profiles, while maintaining mechanical integrity. For these technologies we sought to address two important questions: 1) On the scale at which the device operates, what forces are required to puncture the skin? And 2) What loads can the projections/microneedles withstand prior to failure. First, we used custom fabricated nanoindentation micro-probes to puncture skin at the micrometre scale, and show that puncture forces are ∼ 0.25 - 1.75 mN for fresh mouse skin, in agreement with finite element simulations for our device. Then, we used two methods to perform strength tests of Nanopatch projections with varied aspect ratios. The first method used a nanoindenter to apply a force directly on the top or on the side of individual silicon projections (110 μm in length, 10 μm base radius), to measure the force of fracture. Our second method used an Instron to fracture full rows of projections and characterise a range of projection designs (with the method verified against previous nanoindentation experiments). Finally, we used Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy to visualise projections in situ in the skin to confirm the behaviour we quantified, qualitatively. Micro-device development has proliferated in the past decade, including devices that interact with tissues for biomedical outcomes. The field of microneedles for vaccine delivery to skin has opened new material challenges both in understanding tissue material properties and device material. In this work we characterise both the biomaterial properties of skin and the material properties of our microprojection vaccine delivery device. This study directly measures the micro-scale puncture properties of skin, whilst demonstrating clearly how these relate to device design. This will be of strong interest to those in the field of biomedical microdevices. This includes work in the field of wearable and semi-implantable devices, which will require clear understanding of tissue behaviour and material characterisation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 22%
Student > Master 4 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 17%
Other 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Other 4 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 6 33%
Unspecified 3 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Other 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2016.
All research outputs
#3,496,678
of 7,942,916 outputs
Outputs from Acta Biomaterialia
#609
of 1,253 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,918
of 262,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Biomaterialia
#43
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,942,916 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,253 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,141 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.